Single malt whisky - tasting notes

This Highland Park 1981 was bottled by The Whisky Agency in the Fungi series. One of these releases by TWA that were sold out before most of us heard about it.

 

Highland Park 1981 FungiHighland Park 30 yo 1981 (52,2%,
The Whisky Agency ‘Fungi’ 2011, ex-bourbon wood, 198 btl.)

Nose: a classic nose on hay, paraffin and grass with lots of heather. True Highlands style. Some citrus notes and apples. A little resin and earthy notes. Something yeasty as well. Very faint coconut oil and lemon balm. It could have been very austere and unsexy but there’s just enough fruity sweetness to balance it. Complex. Mouth: starts quite sweet / citrusy and grows grassy over time. Heather again. Seville oranges. Lots of spices (nutmeg, pepper, cloves). Some tannins and bitter notes. Hints of smoke. Again nothing jumps out, everything is presented in a perfect balance. Finish: long, sharply focused on lemon and pepper with slightly oaky notes.

A very clean and typical Highland Park, excellent in many ways but maybe a bit too austere for my personal taste. Around € 170. Sold out.

Score: 90/100


Nikka single cask whiskyLa Maison du Whisky is now selling the latest single casks by Nikka. There’s a Coffey Malt 1998 and Coffey Grain 1997, a heavily peated Yoichi 1991 and this Miyagikyo 1988, all presented in a wooden box.

I suppose all these single casks will be quite limited.

 

 

 

Miyagikyo 1988 #92414 LMdWMiyagikyo 23 yo 1988
(57%, OB 2011, cask #92414)

Nose: exotic fruits (ripe pineapple, banana) and mirabelles come out first, together with cigar boxes. Then a lot of vanilla, sawdust and beeswax. Hints of eucalyptus and white pepper. Lusciously warm. Mouth: punchy with a fine layer of oak. Still quite creamy and fruity at first (blackcurrant, apricot, plums, hints of Turkish delight) but quickly developing on spices (vanilla, pepper, light ginger). A slightly sharp peatiness as well. Light grassy / leathery notes in the end. Finish: long, spicy with vanilla and light peat. Again these notes of oak shavings.

A very fine Japanese malt, with traces of peat and some very prominent new oak notes. Exclusively available from La Maison du Whisky but I’ve noticed a few bottles are on their way to Holland as well. Around € 145.

Score: 88/100


Like its neighbour Caperdonich, 1972 is a great year for Glen Grant. Usually Duncan Taylor is one the best sources for this vintage from both distilleries. A couple of great casks have recently been bottled by The Whisky Agency as well.

 

Glen Grant 1972 Private StockGlen Grant 39 yo 1972 (51,4%, The Whisky Agency ‘Private Stock’ 2011, sherry cask, 87 btl.)

Nose: heavenly. Truly heavenly. Lots of fruity sherry notes: dried apricots, dates, prunes and raspberry jam but also more tropical notes of banana liqueur and pineapple. Very jammy, with lots of honey. Hints of vanilla. Big notes of beeswax and pollen. And wonderful oak polish. And milk chocolate. And marshmallows. Simply exquisite. Mouth: very thick again with rich flavours. Fruit jam all over. Creamy chocolate again. Spices, especially nutmeg and mint. There are quite some oak tannins and dry hints of herbal tea, in fact a bit too much for me. I had this at 93/100 at first, but the more I sipped, the more I was bothered by the wood. Finish: long, oaky and spicy, with all kinds of teas.

The nose is near perfect for me. If only it were a little less woody on the palate… I’m thinking the Glen Grant 1972 we selected at the Spirits in the Sky festival (to be bottled in the near future) is slightly better in this respect. Around € 230. As often with the Private Stock releases, hard to find (no wonder, only 87 bottles).

Score: 91/100


Baràbas BoechoutBaràbas is one of the trendy bars / restaurants in the centre of Boechout near Antwerp. They’re focusing on wines by the glass (40 wines from one of these enomatic machines) and whisky.

Their range features a lot of common brands (Glenmorangie, Bruichladdich, Balvenie, Laphroaig, Highland Park, almost the complete range sometimes) but also foreign names like Mackmyra, Belgian Owl, Amrut or Yamazaki. The most expensive ones are Royal Lochnagar 30yo 1974 Rare Malts and a Nikka Yoichi 20 years old.

Apparently the person responsible for whisky wasn’t there (on a Saturday evening), so the waitress spent 15 minutes trying to match her (phonetic?) notes to something from the menu. At first she brought me a white wine that also started with “fi” and it took another 15 minutes to get an actual Glenmorangie Finealta. Let’s suppose it was an off-day.

 

Location: St. Bavoplein 19, Boechout
Range: +/- 100 single malts
Price: € 5 to € 40 (for a 3cl dram)

What I’ve had: Glenmorangie Finealta (€ 12 – attractive nose, disappointing palate) & Bruichladdich 16yo Bourbon (€ 10 – a good, natural dram)
Glass: Schott Wiesel Pure (ice in a separate glass)

Pros: balanced selection, nice atmosphere, friendly
Cons: slow service, no product knowledge, no music?


Today we’ll try a very recent bottling for Germany, a 23 years old Glenrothes 1988 in the Liquid Treasures range (third series with “Lighthouses” label).

 

Glenrothes 1988 Liquid TreasuresGlenrothes 23 yo 1988 (48,9%, Liquid Treasures 2011, ex-bourbon hogshead)

Nose: sweet start on buttercups, dandelions and a fair dash of honey. Some sweet oranges and a moscatel aroma. Baked apples. Hints of vanilla and caramel. Nice combination of sweet fruits and flowers. Mouth: sweet and creamy, with malt cookies, vanilla and quite a lot of honey again. Orange marmalade. Fruit cake. Evolves on soft spices (cinnamon, subtle pepper). Finish: medium long, with the same malty / honeyed character.

Quite a typical Glenrothes (albeit without sherry). Rounded, sweet with soft spices. Available from eSpirits. Around € 90.

Score: 85/100


A primeur for the Elements of Islay series. This is the first ever independent bottling of Kilchoman, the youngest distillery on Islay. There’s no age statement, but obviously it can’t be older than 5 years.

 

Kilchoman Kh1Kilchoman ‘Kh1’
(59,7%, Elements of Islay 2011, 50 cl)

Nose: very peaty of course with a rather dry start. Mainly ex-bourbon casks? Gentian. Oily notes and soot. Ashes. After a while it develops faint notes of bandages, then some brina and buttered toast and finally some nice, rounded notes of vanilla. It gets better by the minute. Overall clean and focused, without any of the (too) youngish notes of past official bottlings. Mouth: a little sweeter / maltier. Powerful with quite some peppery hotness. Sweet peat and soot. Medicinal notes. Soft vanilla again. Nice notes of baked apple towards the end. Finish: rounder, still some of these apple notes. Very long and peaty. Slightly grassy in the very end.

One of the best Kilchoman releases I’ve had so far, with a balanced sweet touch alongside the heavy peat. Around € 60 – available from TWE.

Score: 86/100


Let’s compare yesterday’s Port Ellen 1983 by The Whiskyman to this similar release bottled a few weeks ago by Malts of Scotland. Dominiek Bouckaert, the man behind The Whiskyman, is also the importer of Malts of Scotland in Belgium.

 

Port Ellen 1983 Malts of ScotlandPort Ellen 28 yo 1983 (58,9%, Malts of Scotland 2011, bourbon hogshead, MoS 11011, 267 btl.)

Nose: it shows the same balanced mixture of briny coastal elements, sooty smoke and rounded fruitiness. Lemon and walnuts. It would be difficult to differentiate between the two, but maybe this MoS version develops a tiny bit more sweet vanilla / dried fruits over time, which is nice, but differences are really small. Both excellent. Mouth: powerful on the palate again. In no particular order: peat, smoke, bags of lemons, sweet grapefruit, pepper, brine… Similarly nervous. Again a tad more candied or is this my imagination? In the end there’s a hint of bitterness. Finish: similar length, similar flavours, similar quality.

Another Port Ellen of very high quality, difficult to pick a favourite so let’s not do that. Good news for those who missed out on the Whiskyman release. This Malts of Scotland version has just arrived in stores. Around € 200.

Score: 92/100


This is probably the most popular release by The Whiskyman so far, a Port Ellen distilled in 1983. Bottled about two months ago but gone from stores soon after.

 

Port Ellen 1983 WhiskymanPort Ellen 27 yo 1983 ‘While my whisky gently weeps’ (55,5%, The Whiskyman 2011, 120 btl.)

Nose: a very balanced expression. Plenty of mineral and coastal notes (seaweed, brine), soft medicinal notes (camphor) and charcoal smoke, but also sweet and fruity citrus aromas (candied lemon and green apple). Hints of marzipan as well, which makes the whole rounded and crystal sharp at the same time. Excellent balance indeed. Mouth: oily with a lot of peat, brine, spices (pepper and ginger) and bitterish lemon zest. The sweetness returns towards the end (especially almonds now, less fruity notes) but it stays kind of sharp. Finish: long, spicy and peaty, with liquorice and lemon zest.

A great bottling showing all the typical Port Ellen qualities. Definitely on par with many official bottlings in terms of complexity and balance. Around € 200. Sold out.

Score: 92/100


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Coming up

  • Dalmore Valour
  • Aberlour a'bunadh Batch #50
  • Glendronach 8yo (Whiskymanufaktur)
  • Yamazaki 12 Year Old
  • Tomatin 1997 (Liquid Library)

1753 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.