Single malt whisky - tasting notes

GlenDronach has a yearly tradition of releasing a single cask for Belgium, bottled straight from the van. In September 2010, they selected a bourbon cask with a virgin oak finish – not an obvious choice considering the GlenDronach tradition of sherry maturation.

While we’re tasting the 2010 release, be prepared for the 2011 edition next week (starting June 20 at TastToe and ending June 25). This time it will be a 2002 Pedro Ximenez finish.

 

GlenDronach 2002 Cask in a vanGlenDronach 8 yo 2002 (58%, OB for
Cask in a Van 2010, cask #4521,
Virgin oak hogshead finish, 312 btl.)

Nose: spicy like a new oak cask can be. Vanilla, a little mint and pepper. Some green banana. Also a few toasted notes (burnt sugar, burnt plywood). With water, it becomes very lightly tropical although the spices are still in the lead. Mouth: hot and gingery. Buttered toast and nuts. Slightly too sweet, a bit artificial (like commercial vanilla & cinnamon sugar). Quite some wood again with nutmeg and pepper. Hints of cake. Burnt sugar again. Finish: rather long and sweet.

A bit peculiar and uncommon for this distillery (although GlenDronach 14yo Virgin Oak was similar). The usual qualities of GlenDronach are not really present here, so I’m expecting more of the sherry version this year. Around € 50.

Score: 82/100


This Glenallachie 1995 is part of the latest series of Malts of Scotland releases. A sister cask #1258 was bottled by Dewar Rattray in 2007.

 

Glenallachie 1995 | Malts of ScotlandGlenallachie 16 yo 1995
(53%, Malts of Scotland 2011,
bourbon hogshead #1257, 222 btl.)

Nose: a very neutral, malty start, full of youngish notes. Half grainy, half fruity, with an overlay of sawdust. Lots of oatmeal. Hints of pears, vanilla and some flowers. A little yeast as well. Uninspiring. Mouth: very grainy and slightly alcoholic. Starts sweet but quickly develops on more bitter notes. A little aspirin. Lemon and mint. Then a hot, peppery burst. Salty liquorice. Quite sharp overall. Finish: medium long, drying and still bitter (grapefruit and lemon peel).

A neutral, harmless nose with a palate that’s too grainy and rough for my taste. Not my favourite release of this round. Around € 60.

Score: 75/100


BNJ or Bailie Nicol Jarvie is said to have the highest malt content of any blended whisky (over 60%). It’s produced at Glenmorangie so Glenmorangie and Glen Moray are obviously the key components, together with 6 other malt whiskies and Girvan grain whisky. The name is taken from Walter Scott’s novel “Rob Roy”.

Bailie Nicol Jarvie was very popular at the beginning of the 20th Century. After that, it went downhill but nowadays it seems to gain popularity again.

 

Bailie Nicol Jarvie BNJBailie Nicol Jarvie (40%, OB 2011)

Nose: fresh, sweet and balanced. Apples and pears, vanilla and lemon. Some Highlands heather as well. Soft hints of butter. Warm grassy notes (dried hay) with soft floral notes. Mouth: crisp barley sweetness, powder sugar and some citrus. Lemon icing on cake. Vanilla. Grains. Soft spices and nutty flavours (hazelnuts and almonds). Delicate hints of peat in the background. Finish: warm, quite nutty with lingering spices and a hint of smoke.

Bailie Nicol Jarvie is not a commonly found blend, but it’s worth looking out for if you want bang for your buck. Even though it’s fairly simple and a little on the sweet side, it can be found for less than € 20. Probably the best you can find for that amount of money.

Score: 80/100


Ardbeg Ten (2011)

13 Jun 2011 | Ardbeg

ArdbegSometimes it’s good to revisit well known whiskies such as Ardbeg Ten. It comes in batches so its profile can change slightly over time. Recently I tried a new batch of Ardbeg 10yo and I thought it was peatier and more straightforward than the one I bought a couple of years ago. Less good than before, or so it seemed.

Let’s find out by comparing my (open) 2006 bottle and the new 2010 version head-to-head. The 2006 version is a little darker than the 2011 version, but the difference is hard to notice.

 

Ardbeg TenArdbeg 10yo ‘Ten’ (46%, OB 2011)

Nose: the 2011 batch is more similar to the 2006 batch than I thought it would be. There’s still the same mixture of big medicinal peat, maritime notes and lemon. The new release seems a bit smokier / ashier while the old one is more camphory and maybe a tad more rounded. The walnut aroma is bigger in the 2006 version as well. Overall only subtle differences. Mouth: quite sweet. Not as smoky as I expected from the nose. There’s salty liquorice and a little ginger. Very dry and earthy, hardly any fruity notes (a hint of apple maybe). Roasted coffee. Very similar to the 2006 version, though it does seem a tad rougher in comparison. Finish: this is where the new batch seems to fade a little sooner. In the old batch there were more burnt grassy notes and ashes, softened by some vanilla, and now it’s mainly the salty liquorice that stands out.

Ardbeg 10 is still a cornerstone of the Islay profile. It’s a fairly simple whisky with a big emphasis on powerful peat and tar. When tasting the 2011 version on its own, I was a bit underwhelmed, but after a direct comparison I was surprised to see it didn’t change too much over the years. The fact that I appreciate it less, is probably because my prefences have changed, instead of the whisky itself.

Overall a nice result if you know the 2006 version must have contained quite some older casks (from the previous distillery owners) and the new 2011 is completely new production. Around € 35 but if you look a bit further, there are
1 litre bottles to be found for approximately € 40.

Score: 85/100


At the Limburg festival, The Whisky Agency presented a whole line of joint bottlings with The Nectar, which is probably our biggest Belgian importer and the company behind the Daily Dram range.

There’s a Caol Ila 1979, Glenlossie 1975, Longmorn 1973, Tomatin 1966, Glen Keith 1970, Highland Park 1975 and this Glenury Royal 1975. All pretty great.

 

Glenury Royal 1973 - Whisky AgencyGlenury Royal 37 yo 1973 (43%,
The Whisky Agency & The Nectar 2011, bourbon hogshead, 146 btl.)

Nose: honeyed nose with apple pie and caramelized sugar. Baked pear, raisins, apricots. Maybe a little papaya. Some nutty notes. Hay. Soft spices (cinnamon, mint). Nicely mellow and “antique” at the same time. Mouth: a bit too soft, but smooth and juicy, showing mainly oranges, both fresh and candied. Pears as well. Developing a spicy side (mint, clove, aniseed) and tobacco which makes it quite oriental. Honey. Some resinous oak and herbal tea. Faint paraffin notes. Finish: not too long, but nicely minty with a bit of drying oak.

Very good whisky, but quite expensive: around € 240 while last year’s Glenury Royal 1973 from the same bottler was only € 180.

Score: 91/100


Here’s another recent release by The Nectar of the Daily Drams.

 

Bowmore 1989 Daily DramBowmore 21 yo 1989 (48,1%,
Nectar of the Daily Drams 2011)

Nose: clean, with peat, seaweed and wet wool. Quite maritime. A little sharp in my opinion and a bit too narrow. Some grassy notes, brine, pepper and mint. A faint vanilla note but very much in the background. Water makes it slightly fragrant (luckily not too flowery though). Mouth: rather dry, very peaty, eartht, with secondary grassy notes and a little lemon. Again a faint vanilla note. Pleasantly salty. Faint hints of Schweppes tonic. Finish: medium long, in line with the palate.

This is not the horrible kind of early 1980’s Bowmore, but I don’t think it’s as good as many 1990’s vintages either. A lukewarm expression in my opinion, very focused but lacking some roundness in addition to the peat and brine. Around € 110.

Score: 82/100


Independent Ardbeg is rare. This 12 years old Ardbeg 1998 bottled by The Nectar of the Daily Drams seems to have been introduced without much ado. It didn’t even appear in some places, they must have known Ardbeg sells like hot cakes these days, even if you don’t announce it.

 

Ardbeg 1998 Daily DramArdbeg 12 yo 1998 (55,4%,
Nectar of the Daily Drams 2011)

Nose: clean, peaty and medicinal. Sea air. Hints of green olives. Less grassy / earthy / peaty than a standard Ardbeg 10yo though, with added almonds and floral notes. Adding water highlights the fruity side, with pear drops and a hint of vanilla. Mouth: very deep peat smoke with a nice layer of sweet fruity notes. Very focused. Almonds, sweet lemon. Liquorice. Big marzipan notes. Smoked fish. Nicer, even sweeter and more aromatic when brought down to 46%. Finish: very long, sweet, smoky and peaty.

A nice variation on the traditional Ardbeg Ten. Slightly rounder, sweeter and slightly wider as well. Play around with water to bring out all of its layers. Around € 80 in Belgium and € 90 in Holland.

Score: 88/100


Here’s a blind sample I received a couple of months ago. I was immediately impressed by the farmy / leathery nose and guessed correctly that it could only be Brora. This is my 700th post so I wanted to present something a little exceptional.

 

Brora 1972 / 2001 DL PlatinumBrora 29 yo 1972 (59,5%, Douglas Laing Platinum 2002, 240 btl.)

Nose: instant farminess and typically Brora, with sheep stable and manure. Earth and hemp. Then some maritime notes. The peat is well integrated and quite fruity. Beautiful layer of beeswax. A little honey and marmalade. Sweet pipe tobacco and leather. When digging a little further, I noticed some rice milk… and a little chocolate? Nice! Something minty and peppery as well (close to prickly iodine). Really impressive. Mouth: very peaty now with lots of tar and pepper. Rather sweet at first, but growing drier and more leathery, with a slightly bitter / earthy finale. Some oak. Drops of lemon. Again a slightly sharp iodine edge. Finish: goes on forever. Peat, tar, ashes, leather…

This Brora shows heavier peat than any other Brora I’ve tried. I think it’s even a little unbalanced on the palate because of this, but the nose is drop dead gorgeous. I’m not hoping to find a bottle, it will be too expensive anyway. Heartfelt thanks for the sample, Thomas!

Score: 94/100


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  • Tony: Well the 1401 batch 8 could be found easily in most places for £200 - indeed I got one for £180 with a discount. The £225 price was a bit high and
  • WhiskyNotes: Don't just look at the UK - it's not always representative for the rest of the world. The last 1401 for Europe was batch 8. I bought that one for €
  • Sam: Nicely written notes, not rated this myself yet. Just to confirm, it's nowhere near a 40% price rise though. The last 1401 released in the UK was at

Coming up

  • Macduff 1980 (Golden Cask)
  • Karuizawa 45 Year Old (cask #2725)
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Craigellachie 13 Years
  • Port Askaig 19 Year Old
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)

1659 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.