Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Lindores Whisky Fest The notorious Whisky festival organised by the Lindores Society is less than two months away. On October 22, 23 and 24, the Bero Hotel in Oostende is the place to be. Entrance is € 10 including a glass.

This festival is special because you won’t find distributors presenting new releases. Instead, expect to find collectors and specialized sellers (Massimo Righi, Diego Sandrin, Lothar Langer among others) with a whole range of rarities, antiquities and legendary bottles. Some of the Lindores members (Geert Bero and Luc Timmermans) will also present their impressive collections.

Another part of Lindores Whisky Fest are the tastings. There’s a 50’s, 60’s and 70’s Bowmore tasting, a Japanese dinner accompanied by 60’s and 70’s Karuizawa and an After-Breakfast with the 40yo Millennium Glenfarclas.

Let me know if you’ll be there as well, maybe we can meet.


Just in: the selection of BenRiach single casks for this year:

BenRiach 1976 8795 single caskBenRiach 1976 33yo cask #8795
(53.2% – bourbon hogshead)
BenRiach 1977 33yo cask #1033
(52.2% – Pedro Ximénez finish)
BenRiach 1978 32yo cask #4417
(50.4% – Tokaji finish)
BenRiach 1979 30yo cask #7511
(47.9% – Bourbon Barrel)
BenRiach 1980 30yo cask #2532
(51.1% – Virgin American Oak finish)
BenRiach 1981 28yo cask #2589
(51.6% – bourbon barrel)
BenRiach 1984 25yo cask #493
(54.1% – bourbon hogshead)
BenRiach 1984 25yo cask #4052
(51.7% – peated / tawny Port Finish)
BenRiach 1991 19yo cask #4389
(54.9% – Virgin American Oak Finish)
BenRiach 1993 17yo cask #7420
(5637% – Gaja Barolo Finish)

The new release celebrates the sixth anniversary of the first bottling of BenRiach under its new independent owners. Master Distiller Billy Walker has selected ten highly distinctive casks from 1976 to 1993 for BenRiach aficionados.

Bottled in July 2010, the ten are all  cask strength, natural colour and non chill-filtered. They are individually numbered and presented in a gift tube.


Master of Malt bottlings proved to be very interesting in the past. While the Master of Malt 30yo 2nd release is still available, there’s a 3rd edition of this undisclosed Speysider. The former was clearly sherry matured, but the colour of its successor suggests bourbon maturation.


Master of Malt 30 years Undisclosed Speyside distillery 30 yo 
(40%, Master of Malt 2009, 3rd edition)

Nose: a classic bourbon matured profile with truckloads of honey and some lovely fruits (melon, apricot, ripe banana, papaya). Big big vanilla (coming close to actual bourbon at times) and hints of cinnamon. Sugared almonds. Warm oaky notes and wax are easy to notice, but the nose is not tired at all. Great nose. Mouth: a spicy attack, but it seems to fall flat soon after the arrival. Much more oak now, a bit too much even. Pine resin and nutmeg. Hints of grapefruit but overall not nearly as fruity as the nose made me expect. Finish: a bit undefined, with dry oak and subtle fruits.

The glorious nose and the woody palate reminded me of another undisclosed Speysider by Thosop. I wouldn’t be surprised if they came from the same distillery. Don’t get me wrong, I could sniff this all day and it’s certainly nice enough to justify the price tag (about € 125). Available from Master of Malt.

Score: 85/100


Glenury Royal could claim ‘royal’ in its name thanks to a friend of the founder, Captain Robert Barclay. The distillery was founded in 1825 and its license was cancelled in 1992. The site was sold for residential estate.

This 36 year old Glenury Royal was part of the Diageo Special Releases of 2005. Only 2100 bottles were made available at around € 600. It seems it has never been a great seller because recently they were offered in different shops for as low as € 200.


Glenury Royal 1968/2005 Glenury Royal 36 yo 1968 
(51,2%, OB 2005, 2100 btl.)

Nose: scented and floral with a significant amount of oak polish and sawdust. A bit of vanilla. Mango. Hints of parma violets and lavender, but not really perfumy. Some peaches and apple compote. Gets quite leathery and chalky. Some peaty / farmy notes but they seem to disappear as soon as you pinpoint them. A complex and rewarding note. Fresh, fruity with a distinct ‘oldness’ to it at the same time. Quite lovely. Mouth: very juicy and fat, building up much more peat now. Lots of spices from the oak, sawdust and again a leathery foundation. Hints of smoke and roasted nuts. Some bitterness and herbal notes towards the finish. Finish: long, slightly bitter, with toasted oak, nuts and varnish.

A very complex malt with a unique but slightly difficult character. It seems to continuously switch between fruity notes, herbal notes, freshness, harshness and many other things… Still available with a nice discount.

Score: 91/100


Another Ledaig, distilled in 2005 this time so only 4 years old. The colour already tells you that it’s different from yesterday’s Ledaig 2001/2010 by The Nectar of the Daily Drams – this one was matured in a sherry cask.

There has been some debate about the high scores of these Ledaigs on Whiskyfun. As the price was reasonable, they sold out immediately (as often the case). Many people seem to forget our tastes are all different, so don’t get carried away and please, never trust reviewers (wink).

 

Ledaig 2005/2010 - Berry Bros Ledaig 4 yo 2005 (62,7%, Berry Bros & Rudd 2010, sherry butt #900008)

Nose: a typical young marriage of heavy peat and heavy sherry. Orangettes (orange filled chocolate), some tobacco. Whiffs of gouache. Lots of smoke and burnt biscuits rather than the plain earthy peat from yesterday’s Ledaig. Some briney notes. Sweet hints of red fruit marmalade and dark syrup. Some ginger. Water highlights soot, canvas fabric and a blackberry fruitiness. Mouth: again very peaty, this time with a bigger spicy component (pepper and ginger). Hints of toffee. Burnt pieces of meat. Coffee and bitter chocolate in the end. Water makes it slightly mentholated and even more sooty. Finish: long, smoky with a sweet edge.

Quite an aggressive malt – all of its dials are turned to maximum power. Indeed quite similar to the rapidly matured Port Charlottes of last year. Still not completely my taste (I’m quite a wuss you know…) but the sherry certainly adds depth and width compared to yesterday’s Ledaig. Around € 45.

Score: 86/100


Ledaig (pronounced Led-chick) is peated Tobermory, the only distillery on the Isle of Mull. The distillery has been closed more often than it was operational and production didn’t resume in a stable way until 1989. Half of their spirit output is unpeated, half is peated.

 

Ledaig 2001/2010 - Daily DramLedaig 8 yo 2001
(61%, The Nectar of the Daily Drams 2010)

Nose: leathery peat with hints of seawater and tarry boat rope. Quite oily with a sweet background. Candied lemon peel. A hint of toffee. When compared to peated Islay whisky, it’s probably closest to Ardbeg or Kilchoman. Very clean but fairly mono-dimensional. Water makes it slightly fresher and adds hints of lemon. Mouth: straightforward peat (much more than expected), quite sweet and rounded, with a nice lemon/salt combination. Peated margarita? More candied with a few drops of water – hints of sweet tobacco in the aftertaste. Finish: peat, peat, sweet peat.

Well-made with a big peat blast and a coating sweetness. Promising for the future of the distillery but nothing exceptional and still quite youngish in character. Too focused on peat for my taste – a slightly lighter alternative for Kilchoman fans maybe? Around € 40 and readily available in this part of Europe.

Score: 83/100


Amrut Double Cask

23 Aug 2010 | * World

Amrut blended two 7 year old casks for this release, filled in 2002 and 2003. These are the oldest casks that were ever bottled at Amrut distillery.

While it may seem young, Amrut says it’s unlikely that they will be able to produce such an aged whisky again in the Indian climate. The casks were filled with 360 liters of spirit and the end result was a mere 159 liters. Moreover, the strength went up from 62,5% to 69,8%. That’s the kind of evaporation they have to deal with.


Amrut Double Cask 7yo Amrut ‘Double Cask’ (46%, OB 2010, cask #2874 + 2273, 306 btl.)

Nose: a rich, honeyed profile with loads of vanilla pods and creamy cake. Also quite floral, mainly buttercups. There’s plenty of fruits: pineapple candy, pink grapefruit, banana, caramelized apples… Apple pie. Hints of sweet oak and barley sugar. Just excellent – it’s like a Speyside grandpa with the vivacity of a youngster. Mouth: more of the same (yay). A liquid fruit salad with papaya, kiwi, mango and pineapple, lifted by notes of lime. So much fruit, so much body, so much roundness. Again a coating of vanilla and powdered sugar. Subtle spices. Finish: long and fruity. Delicate oak with cinnamon and very light pepper.

The best Amrut so far for me, no doubt about that. But I’m afraid this is also where it stops: it’s probably impossible to gain more complexity in a natural way. In the end the effect of time can’t be beaten, even when your spirit is as perfect as this one. Sold in Europe and Canada only as far as I know, but now sold out in most places. Around € 75.

Score: 91/100

 

One remark: the packaging looks okay but feels like it’s made in a sweatshop. The folding of the box is anything but accurate, the glue doesn’t hold the sides together, the white cardboard is completely smudged on the inside, etc. I know the packaging is not the most important element, but please, some quality control would be appropriate for such a special bottling. After looking around, it’s clear that my own flimsy box is not a one-off.


This Mortlach 1998 is the first bottling by The Whisky Shop Dufftown, run by Mike Lord. It’s a refill sherry hogshead selected from the Gordon & MacPhail stocks.

With 6 active distilleries (Mortlach being one of them, and the Glenfiddich / Balvenie / Kinivie group being the best known) in a town of merely 1200 people, Dufftown is said to be the whisky capital of Scotland.


Mortlach 1998 Whisky Shop DufftownMortlach 12 yo 1998 (59,1%, Gordon & MacPhail Exclusive for Whisky Shop Dufftown 2010,
cask #14438)

Nose: instead of the expected sherry notes, the first things I get are herbal tea and lots of mint and pine needles. In my opinion, Mortlach is often blemished by sulphury off-notes (not from bad sherry casks, but probably due to to a lack of copper contact during distillation and/or the usage of worm tubs), but this one is (almost) clean, with nice raisins and fruit marmalade. Burnt sugar and hints of bread crust. Water highlights red fruits. Mouth: again an unusually mentholated profile. On a second level there is strawberry jam and chocolate coated nuts. Well spiced. Rounder and fruitier with a few drops of water. Still rather herbal. Finish: quite long, peppery with a repetition of the herbal sherry theme.

Considering the fact that I’m not a big fan of Mortlach, this is definitely enjoyable and rather unique.

Score: 83/100


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Coming up

  • Auchentoshan 15yo (Kintra)
  • Lagavulin 1997 Distillers Edition
  • Ben Nevis 1997 (Maltbarn)
  • Tomatin 1978 (Cadenhead / Nectar)
  • Aultmore 2007 (Daily Dram)
  • Karuizawa 45 Year Old (cask #2925)
  • Glengoyne 1999 (Palo Cortado)

1506 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.