Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Mannochmore is one of these active distilleries that is hardly seen on the market. It’s modern (founded in 1971 on the grounds of the Glenlossie distillery) and focused on producing blender’s whisky. Here’s a 28 year-old single cask bottled by Liquid Sun.

 

Mannochmore 1982 Liquid SunMannochmore 28 yo 1982 (49,4%,
Liquid Sun 2011, bourbon hogshead, 131 btl.)

Nose: slightly neutral start on malt and grassy notes. Green apples and lemon. Some flowery top notes as well. Then grows a bit warmer, with quite a lot of hay. Soft leather. Rather elegant, it seems younger than it actually is and the fruitiness is pleasantly dry and mineral at the same time. Mouth: quite soft at first, with orchard fruits, grassy notes and some spices. There’s a nervousness / hotness with herbal notes growing over time. Again an interesting mix of sweet notes and lots of dry, spicy (even slightly earthy) elements. Finish: medium length, spicy with a bitter edge.

A Mannochmore with a pleasant “green” fruitiness and quite some grassy / mineral notes. Give it some time to open up.
Around € 110.

Score: 85/100


Let’s start by checking out this Tomatin 1976. We’ve seen similar releases with Daily Dram and Whisky Agency labels recently.

 

Tomatin 1976 Liquid SunTomatin 34 yo 1976
(48,7%, Liquid Sun 2011, sherry butt, 366 btl.)

Nose: typical Tomatin fruitiness, although it starts nutty / musty and develops the fruity notes over time. Tangerines, apricots, mangos. Excellent strawberries as well. Blueberry jam. Very fruity, with silky sherry and soft polished oak. Quite some mint and eucalyptus as well, more so than I remember from previous releases. Mouth: big tropical fruitiness (the whole shebang: mango, guava, tangerine, banana, soft citrus, a little cassis). Almost no oak (a faint peppery note though). Finish: long, fruity with more spices and a little cocoa.

Wow, this Tomatin 1976 combines the best elements from the other recent releases, in my opinion. Very exemplary. The bottle will be empty before you know it. Around € 150.

Score: 91/100


Liquid Sun

06 Jul 2011 | * News

Liquid Sun Whisky AgencySome independent German bottlers have a huge pile of available casks. This leads to a whole array of sub-brands. Liquid Sun is the latest series by The Whisky Agency.

While the first Liquid Sun bottlings (with a minimalist white label) were aimed at the Swedish and Asian markets, the new releases (with a more commercial, more sunny label) have showed up in German shops as well so maybe the rest of Europe will follow soon?

At first I thought the chosen casks were meant to be younger and better value than other Whisky Agency ranges, but I’m not sure about that anymore. Here are a few bottlings from the recent series:

    • Ardmore 1992 (bourbon)
    • Bunnahabhain 1968 (refill sherry)
    • Laphroaig 1991 (sherry)
    • Laphroaig 1998 (bourbon)
    • Linkwood 1989 (refill sherry)

I had another Longmorn 1976 waiting to be reviewed, one that is unfortunately long gone from stores. It was released by Whisky-Fässle in 2008 and back then it was quite an eye-opener for these great bourbon matured Longmorns.

 

Longmorn 1976 Whisky-FässleLongmorn 32 yo 1976 (54,7%,
Whisky-Fässle 2008, bourbon hogshead)

Nose: starts slightly less tropical than the Thosop version. More mineral notes, more lemon as well. Oranges as the main element, although the gooseberries and apricots show up after some time. Big waxy notes. Not unlike some Clynelish. Mouth: very fresh and citrusy, plenty of tangerine and grapefruit (both pink and yellow ones). A bit of roasted maltiness as well. Not much oak and less spices than the other releases. Almond notes. Not the most complex Longmorn, but the lack of oak makes it very very enjoyable. Finish: long and citrusy with a tad more oak now.

It would be interesting to make a grid of these Longmorn 1976’s. You could order them by vanilla / honeyed notes (with the MoS leading the pack) or by tropical fruitiness (Thosop) or by waxy minerality (Whisky-Fässle). They’re all very good so in the end it comes down to your personal preferences.

Score: 90/100


Thosop bottlings (a label founded by Luc Timmermans) are now co-selected and distributed by The Whiskyman a.k.a. fellow Lindores member Dominiek Bouckaert.

Recently we’ve had Longmorn 1976’s bottled by Malts of Scotland and
The Whisky Agency, both very attractive. Let’s find out how this new one compares. Unfortunately at the moment I can only do a direct head-to-head with the Malts of Scotland version.

 

Longmorn 1976 ThosopLongmorn 35 yo 1976
(53%, Thosop, bourbon barrel, 134 btl.)

Nose: very fruity and apparently more complex than the other 1976’s I’ve tried so far. Citrus, tropical fruits (kumquat, mango), gooseberries. Quite some mint and eucalyptus as well, certainly more than the MoS release. Less vanilla though, and almost none of the great pastry notes (you can’t have it all). Then a plethora of small layers in the background: soft and slightly dusty oak, hay, pepper and cinnamon. Excellent. Mouth: oily, with plenty of fruits: grapefruit, tangerine, mango. Balanced by spices (ginger, pepper) and softly resinous oak. Overall more fruity than the others. A little leather. Herbal tea (without the dryness) and hints of toffee towards the end. Finish: long and fruity, with a soft resinous / grassy edge.

 

On the nose, this Longmorn plays the card of freshness and complexity. The Malts of Scotland version is warmer on the nose (slightly more honeyed / marzipanny), but overall there are more layers to discover in this Thosop version.  I’m happy to give it an extra point for its wonderful balance and richness, despite the fact that I’m instantly in love with the MoS nose every time I try it. Around € 200. I’m sure it will be gone quickly.

Score: 92/100


Nikka Pure Malt White is our final review in the Japanese series. As a matter of fact, it’s not entirely Japanese. Pure Malt White is a blend of Scotch Islay whisky (Coal Ila?) and a smaller portion of peated Nikka whisky. Nikka Pure Malt Black is also peated but it contains mainly Nikka whisky and no Scotch.

 

Nikka Pure Malt WhiteNikka Pure Malt White (43%, OB 2010, 50cl)

Nose: a very refined mix of elegant peat (clear and present, but not a kick in your face) and juicy fruits. Cold ashes, medicinal notes in the distance. Great balance with the Japanese influence: coconut cream, oranges, nectarine, passion fruit, a little leather. Hints of vanilla. I really like the fusion. Mouth: starts Caol Ila-esk: smoky and slightly peppery. Hints of walnuts. Evolves on malty notes with honey and a distinct floweriness, which develops into a clear soapiness. Is this Yoichi and 1980’s Bowmore then? Bowmore is owned by Suntory, so it’s unlikely they would sell spirit to their opponent Nikka, but you never know. Finish: again quite floral (violets and lavender) with a dry peatiness.

Flowery notes are sometimes a bit tricky and personally I have difficulty with all kinds of soapy notes. Maybe other batches are more enjoyable? Around € 30 (50 cl).

Score: 75/100

This concludes our little Japanese series. Some great Longmorns coming up after the weekend.


A newborn of only 4 months old, from a Japanese distillery founded in 2007. The label says this Chichibu was distilled June-July 2008 and bottled October 2008. It was one batch of 400 kg of Braemar barley.

After this release, there have been other limited single malt Chichibu bottlings (new hogshead, double matured and heavily peated).

 

Chichibu Newborn #126Chichibu Newborn 4 months 2008
(62,5%, OB 2008, bourbon barrel #126)

Nose: clean and sweet with candy sugar and pear drops. Orchard fruits. Plum eau-de-vie. On the other hand, it’s also slightly spicy, like a good Dutch jenever, which is less typical for new spirit. Also slightly flowery (jasmin?). Mouth: strong, big notes of muesli and oats, some dried apricots. Hints of grappa. Also a faint earthy element (nice to see this in new-make already). Finish: grainy and quite spirity.

I don’t have the experience to spot a really good new-make among the normal ones, but this Chichibu shows a few notes that I hadn’t seen in new-make before. Simple but promising I would say. Around € 75.

Score: 65/100


Yamazaki 18 Years

30 Jun 2011 | * Japan

The first time I tried Yamazaki 18yo (at Spirits in the Sky four years ago), I immediately bought a bottle. Now’s the time to pay homage to this Japanese classic. One of my all-time favourites when it comes to (relatively affordable) Japanese whisky, although the price has taken a big hike since it won a couple of awards.

Yamazaki 18 is composed of toasted American oak sherry puncheons, European oak sherry butts and Japanese Mizunara oak puncheons.

 

Yamazaki 18 yearsYamazaki 18 yo (43%, OB 2008, L8CP3)

Nose: very very smooth, with a great interaction of chocolate, raisins and oak polish (maybe even a little glue). Soft vanilla. Luscious fruity notes, both dried (dates) and fresh (red fruits). Rather oriental as well: hints of baklava and incense, with a wonderful dampness. Herbal tea. Leather. Hints of dark rum. Syrup. Mouth: quite oaky now (with a resulting sourness) but this adds to the oriental character. Dried fruits (dates, prunes) freshened with citrus peel. Caramel. Creamy sherry notes. Bramble and honey. Tobacco. Finish: balanced sweet / dry and medium long. Maybe a hint of smoke?

A top quality dram, full of Japanese character but very rounded as well, which is slightly less common for Nippon whisky. No surprise it wins so many awards, this is highly recommended.

Be sure to shop around, because I’ve seen prices between € 85 and € 135 from retailers that usually have a similar price setting.

Score: 90/100


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  • Taco: I'm about finished with a bottle of this and am still amazed at how good it is. It's much more subtle than the popular sherry finished whiskers, but
  • Tony: I guess they are not planning on selling much to the likes of us. "Premiumisation" gone mad...
  • Johan Andersson: I'm in Campbeltown right now for the Springbank Open Day on Thursday. This review is really spot on. I really love Longrow and especially the 18 it be

Coming up

  • Highland Park Sigurd
  • Paul John Edited
  • Ledaig 42 Years Old
  • Aberlour a'bunadh Batch #50
  • Bowmore Gold Reef
  • Tomatin 1997 (Liquid Library)
  • Springbank Vintage 2001
  • Mortlach Rare Old

1790 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.