Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Bruichladdich is regularly producing whisky made of traceable barley, grown by 14 Islay farms. It is 100% organic and local malt, with the Optic variety having the largest share nowadays (together with 7 other varieties).

The distillery already jumped on this “terroir” wagon in 2004, when whisky was distilled from Chalice barley grown on the Kentraw farm, less than a mile from the distillery. For Feis Ile 2010, this first Islay grown whisky was released as a five year-old.

Note that using local barley was obviously very common in the past, so this Bruichladdich is more precisely the first “remake” of local Islay whisky in the past few Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2004decades.

 

Bruichladdich Islay barley 2004 (57,5%,
OB for Feis Ile 2010, fresh sherry butt #1667, 1060 btl.)

Nose: sweet and sour notes. Redcurrant, gooseberry… Rhubarb pie. Pêches Louis with brown sugar. There’s also a burnt element in the background and a winey overtone. Mouth: sweeter now, with notes of red candy and milk chocolate. Quite sour and sharp nonetheless. Roasted peanuts and bittersweet notes of caramel. A hint of soft pepper. Finish: warm and sweet.

A Bruichladdich with a big malty profile and highly acidic fruit notes. Not too bad but a nice marketing concept rather than a nice drinking whisky.

Score: 76/100


This 30 years old Glen Grant is an unusual whisky. It has been matured in a brandy butt and finished in a sherry cask – I can’t think of similar malts.

It was bottled to celebrate the 60th Anniversary of independent bottler Douglas Laing.


Glen Grant 30yo Douglas Laing 60Glen Grant 30 yo 1979 (52,5%, Douglas Laing 2009, 60th Anniversary bottling, brandy butt – sherry finish, 282 btl.)

Nose: starts on notes of burnt sugar, smoke and honey. Bread crust. Caramelized apples. Slightly dusty. Chocolate. Cinnamon. Interesting but quite winey. Mouth: full and rather winey again. Sour apple cider, a sharp maltiness and a lot of oak. Tangy herbal elements (cough syrup, ginger). Sweet / sour combo, some cocoa. Gets very bitter in the end, rather difficult to enjoy. Finish: long, with liquorice and herbs.

I guess this cask was selected for its unusual maturation and equally unusual flavours. A shame really, I could think of a dozen other Glen Grants that are better suited to celebrate your anniversary. Around € 240.

Score: 77/100


Linkwood is part of the Diageo empire. Together with the surrounding distilleries in West Speyside, it holds an annual competition for spirit yield efficiency (litres of spirit per ton of malt), and Linkwood regularly wins it, together with Glen Elgin.

Although most of the production goes to Johnnie Walker and White Horse, independent single malt bottlings are fairly common as well. This 36 years old Linkwood 1973 was bottled for the 10th Anniversary of The Whisky Exchange in 2009.


Linkwood 1973 TWE Linkwood 36 yo 1973 (49,7%, The Whisky Exchange 10th Anniversary 2009, bourbon cask)

Nose: a delicious old Speysider, vibrant and utterly fruity. A vanilla infused fruit salad with ripe banana, some mango, dried apricots, papaya… Hints of good piña colada. A little polished oak. Pancakes (VIPS tortitas anyone?). Faint tobacco leafs and spices in the background. Really outstanding. Mouth: fruity again, some pineapple, orange and apricot but less abounding in vitality than on the nose. A more spicy kick with ginger, cinnamon and soft pepper. Oaky in a good way, giving it a lot of depth but not the dryness. Finish: long, growing more tannic and resinous now, although the fruitiness seems to go on and on.

Clearly the best Linkwood I’ve had so far. A stunning nose and overall on par with the lovely Clynelish TWE 10th Anniversary, although that one still has a slight edge in complexity for me. Around € 170, still available from TWE.

Score: 92/100


Rosebank was closed in 1993. While most of the equipment was still in place and rumours circulated that Diageo would eventually restart production, the copper was stolen at the beginning of 2009 and the Lowlands distillery may be lost forever. There have been a few official bottlings in the Rare Malts series, a Flora & Fauna 12y and a 25 year-old from the same year as this Daily Dram release (bottled in 2007).

In 2006, this was one of two releases in the first Daily Dram series ever. You may think it is diluted, but it’s actually cask strength.


Daily Dram - Rosebank 1981 Rosebank 1981 (43%, Daily Dram 2006)

Nose: classic Rosebank lemons. Tangerines and other citrus fruits. Juicy pears. Really fresh. Buttercups. Some tropical notes as well: passion fruit, pineapple. Buttercups. After a while, there’s a peaty note in the background. That’s not completely uncommon for old Rosebank (Rosebank 25yo OB also has some). Develops on slightly grassy, waxy and minty notes. Fruit tea. Mouth: fruity (oranges) but slightly sour at the same time. Lots of (pink) grapefruit and green tea. Apple. Hints of cloves. Finish: medium length, on lemon candy and tangerine.

Impressive, certainly because other distilleries generally need more years to develop a similar profile. It shares similar elements with old Clynelish or some 30-40 year-old Longmorns. Not available any more.

Score: 89/100

ps/ Re-tasted at a Fulldram tasting in May 2011. Added one extra point.


Banff was closed in 1983 and demolished in a fire in 1991. There’s limited stock left so expressions are pretty rare. The distillery doesn’t have much fame and Banffs tend to be a little unbalanced, but some early 1970’s expressions are great.

This Banff 1978 was distilled in October 1978, so within the first weeks of your reviewers existence. It has been matured in a sherry cask and bottled by Ian Macleod (owners of Glengoyne distillery) in their Chieftain’s range.


Banff 1978 Chieftain's 3771 Banff 26 yo 1978 (46%, Chieftain’s 2004, sherry cask #3771, 462 btl.)

Nose: a sherry nose allright. Dried fruits like sultanas and figs. Fresher, sparkling apricot notes as well. Sour apples. Some leather. Cinnamon and liquorice. A faint hint of smoke and fat, which makes this a nice full-bodied old-style nose. Mouth: spicy Christmas cake, a few burnt notes. Nutmeg. Sour cherries. Cinnamon. Raisins. Finish: not too long, spicy and drying, fading to liquorice.

Well, this Banff is not of exceptional quality, but it’s quite balanced and certainly enjoyable. Difficult to find, expect to pay around € 135.

Score: 84/100


Dalmore Mackenzie

20 Jul 2010 | Dalmore

Dalmore Mackenzie painting The Dalmore Mackenzie is a limited edition of 2400 bottles (+ 600 for travel retail) supporting the Clan Mackenzie Society. The bottle comes with a print of the Benjamin West painting “Fury of the Stag”, signed by John Mackenzie, the head of the Clan.

This famous Highland Clan owned The Dalmore for almost 100 years, and they are still connected through the family icon, the stag head, which The Dalmore uses to adorn their bottles. The partnership (which will not end after this special release) aims to raise funds to refurbish the Clan’s Castle Leod.


The Dalmore MackenzieDalmore Mackenzie 1992 (46%, OB 2010, port finish, 3000 btl.)

Nose: fragrant and fruity with redcurrant, cherry and fresh citrus (oranges, grapefruit). A hint of ginger. Underneath is a subtle aroma of mocha glaze and roasted nuts. Nice. Mouth: on the palate it has more body than on the nose, with lots of spices. It’s nuttier (almonds, hazelnut) and even slightly smoky. Nutmeg and ginger again. Still some fruity notes, but dried fruits this time (prunes). A tad winey. Hints of vanilla. Fades on liquorice. Finish: spicy with a return to candied oranges.

Dalmore Mackenzie is a good example of the Dalmore house style, while at the same time being lifted by the Port influence. Smooth and balanced, but a little expensive. Around € 140.

Score: 85/100


Ardbeg Lord Robertson Lord Robertson is a former Nato Secretary General born on Islay. Ten years ago, when he visited the distillery, a cask of Ardbeg was laid down for his charity project Erskine. About two weeks ago it was bottled and made available in the online shop.

It’s a fairly standard 10 years old Ardbeg, but as usual Ardbeg could charge £ 220 and still sell out in five hours, simply because it’s a single cask. At least this time the earnings are donated to charity.

 

Ardbeg 2000 Robertson #1217 Ardbeg 10 yo 2000 “Lord Robertson” (53%, OB 2010, Committee release, cask #1217, 202 btl.)

Nose: the sweetness of white chocolate, vanilla and marzipan is very nice. It shows sweet peat, but it’s not very smoky. Some apples and cloves. Faint hints of antiseptics and wet wool. Toffee. Water brings out freshly laid tarmac and burnt tyres with a citrus overtone. Mouth: a nice pepper / peat / lime combo. Dark soot and tar but at the same time that sweet barley coating again. Chocolate and sugared almonds. I’m missing a bit of complexity in the middle: there’s black soot and white chocolate but not much in between, if you know what I mean. Finish: long and smoky with a hint of cocoa.

An interesting young Ardbeg with a fairly sweet profile. Nice enough as long as you don’t take into account the price.

Score: 86/100


Monkey Shoulder

17 Jul 2010 | * Blends

Monkey Shoulder is a “triple malt”, a blended malt containing whisky from Glenfiddich, Balvenie and Kininvie (all three part of the same company). Kininvie is the newest distillery – it has been in production for over 10 years but we’ve never seen a single malt bottling.

Monkey shoulder - whiskyMonkey Shoulder is said to be around 6 years old. It is released in batches which may differ slightly, but overall the profile should remain quite constant.

 

Monkey Shoulder (40%, OB 2008)

Nose: Fresh, very fruity, candied and slightly youngish. Notes of apple sweets and honey. Some apricot and banana. There’s a flowery side to it (violets maybe?). Mouth: suddenly it becomes clear that this is not a single malt. The attack is very weak and the first flavours are quite generic (grains and caramel). It misses some punch. Is that vanilla? Or mint maybe, in the end? Finish: rather short, grainy and nutty in the very end.

Monkey Shoulder is very smooth, easy-going but also quite harmless. Probably a great base for a Manhattan, but for € 30 there are better options in the single malt shelf.

Score: 74/100


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Coming up

  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Benriach 1991 (MoS for QV.ID)
  • Blair Athol 1991 (Wemyss Malts)
  • Burnside 1989 (Maltbarn)
  • Ardbeg 15yo 1973 (Sestante)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)
  • Ord 16yo (Manager's Dram)
  • Balblair Millennium

1636 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.