Single malt whisky - tasting notes

This year at Feis Ile, Bowmore had a hand signed re-packaged version of the pleasant Bowmore Tempest, as well as a 25th Anniversary bottling. It was a 25 year-old at cask strength. Only 100 bottles were bottled and the actual number available to the public was even lower, around 60. This whisky was aged in the n°1 vaults, under sea level.

25 years old means it was distilled in the first half of the 1980’s. Oh-oh

 

Bowmore 25yo Feis Ile Bowmore 25 yo
(53,1%, OB 2010, Feis Ile, 100 btl.)

Nose: very maritime with notes of sea breeze and wet hay. Quite some iodine as well. Mild peat smoke. This is backed by some sherry influence (dried fruits) and mint. A rather promising nose, even with faint hints of parma violets. Mouth: well there you have it. Soap, and quite a lot of it! Violet candy. Geraniums. Lavender. A typical 1980’s Bowmore profile that we’re not too fond of. Quite peppery as well and few citrus notes. Finish: still very candied and soapy, with a salty edge and citrus.

Yet another typical 1980’s Bowmore although on the nose it’s masked almost completely. Originally around € 400, now being sold for € 600-700. Not worth it from a quality point of view, but interesting as a collectors item.

Score: 68/100


This Karuizawa 1982 fetched 89 points in the 2009 Malt Maniacs Awards – just one point short of a gold medal (and one point below the highly praised Karuizawa 1972).

It was bottled for the 10th Anniversary of The Whisky Exchange.

 

Karuizawa 1982 TWE Karuizawa 27 yo 1982 (56,1%, OB 2009 for The Whisky Exchange 10th Anniversary, sherry cask #2748)

Nose: one of the more balanced Karuizawa without the matchstick notes that they sometimes display. Lots of spicy Christmas cake and café latte. Café noir biscuits. Some mint. Sour orange liqueur. It also shows a slightly forestial side. Mouth: pretty dense and slightly alcoholic. Notes of raisins and a little rubber. Cloves and other herbs. Slightly bitter coffee again with a bit of chocolate. Quite dry and remarkably savoury. Finish: medium length, with a perfect dryness and a faint hint of smoke.

Another excellent Karuizawa, not at all tired and very consistent. A profile that you won’t get from other distilleries. Around € 140 and still available from TWE.

Score: 90/100

Thanks for the sample swap, Johan!


Berry’s Speyside Reserve is a blended malt that combines whisky from two well known Speyside distilleries. There’s no official information, but I’ve read it could be Dailuaine and Miltonduff (which is a bit strange as Berry Bros owns The Glenrothes distillery).

In the same series, there’s also an Islay Reserve and undisclosed rum and cognacs. They are “created as an introduction to the world of Berry’s spirits, each one carefully chosen and blended”.

 

Berry's Speyside Reserve Berry’s Speyside Reserve 
(46%, Berry Bros & Rudd 2009)

Nose: a nice toffee / citrus / malt character. But there’s also a fresher, more floral side to it, with pear drops, banana and a little heather honey. Some hay. Mouth: sweet and creamy. A bit of caramel. Again quite fruity but after a few seconds, the spiciness grows stronger (ginger, nutmeg). Quite malty. There are hazelnuts as well. Finish: medium length, with spices and soft liquorice.

A very smooth whisky. I really appreciate this kind of “minimal” blending with just two components. The result has more character than a regular blend while at the same time having a very attractive pricing: around € 40.

Score: 81/100


I’m quite surprised with the tempo of the Malts of Scotland team. They release their whisky at a serious pace, and luckily the quality doesn’t seem to suffer.

By the way, Malts of Scotland also released a Glen First Class (sherried Glenfarclas in disguise – € 40) and a Glen Peat Class (blended Islay malt, matured together – € 50). Both are bottled at 50% and positioned as entry malts for people who are not (yet) familiar with the concept of single casks.

 

Bunnahabhain 1992 - Malts of Scotland Bunnahabhain 17 yo 1992 (54,4%, Malts of Scotland 2010, cask #1419, 603 btl.)

Nose: old, dusty sherry, which reminds me of walking in a wine cellar. The influence of the wine is very heavy but quite clean. Burnt sugar and sweet fruit compote. Walnuts. Some gingerbread notes. Very lightly coastal / seaweedy as well. With water: slightly meaty with faint smoke. But a little less clean now… Mouth: mouth-coating and quite hot. The ginger notes get stronger. Some nutty notes (walnuts again, some almonds). Getting extremely dry and a little bitter. Water brings out cigar associations (tobacco leaves, cigar boxes) but also takes away most of the intensity. Some oak polish. Finish: long and really dry. Hints of liquorice.

This malt has some glorious moments but also a few dips. The combo of bitterness and sweetness is nicely balanced but its dry power is a little invading as well. A good choice if you want heavy sherry with more complexity than just the wine.

Score: 83/100


Too hot for whisky

03 Jul 2010 | * News

Enjoy the weather and see you in a few days.
In the meantime, check out the second edition of the Whisky Round Table.

The question was How did you develop you "nose" and "palate"? What was your turning point for actually trusting what you were smelling and tasting? What do you do, if anything, to strengthen your senses and/or help your smell and taste to grow?


The weather is currently too hot in Belgium for whisky. In 35°C, water seems to be a better option so let’s talk about adding water to your dram.

In recent years we’ve seen the rise of premium waters. There are water bars and stores specialized in waters from around the world. As I walked through a local supermarket with more than 70 different brands of water, I noticed that some of them were said to be great for diluting whisky. Among them, Gleneagles and this Duchy Royal Deeside.

Duchy is bottled from a source in Royal Deeside, Scotland. It makes sense to use Scottish water as distilleries also tend to use local, natural spring water during the Duchy Royal Deesidedistillation process, so we’re probably not adding foreign elements. Royal Deeside is low in minerals, so again we don’t add possible flavour elements like salts or chloride.


Duchy Royal Deeside (0,0%, OB 2010, still)

Some waters are practically tasteless but Royal Deeside has a taste. It’s difficult to describe but it seems a bit metallic which is surprising as the mineral levels are low. As a drinking water, I would prefer other types.

When diluting a whisky, I don’t notice anything special, which I suppose is exactly what we’re trying to achieve. On the other hand, I don’t think this water is special. I guess any brand of bottled water will do as long as they don’t contain excessive amounts of certain minerals. Or use filtered Brita water like I normally do.

I’ll try to compare with some other brands that claim to be ideal for whisky, but for the moment, I don’t see a reason to search for any kind of special “whisky water”.

If you have other experiences, let’s hear your comments.


Douglas Laing is well known for its Old Malt Cask series. Recently they’ve also introduced the Old Grain Cask. It’s a series of single cask bottlings from single grain distilleries.

Garnheath (also spelled Garneath) is so rare most people have never heard of it. The distillery was located in the Lowlands, established in 1965 and closed down in 1986. The number of releases can be counted on one hand. Douglas Laing seem to have a reasonable stock – recently they’ve also released a similar cask in the Clan Denny range at 47,9%.

 

Garnheath 1969 Douglas Laing Garnheath 40 yo 1969 (51,6%, Douglas Laing OGC 2009, 154 btl.)

Nose: very smooth and gentle. Typical old grain whisky (coconut and vanilla) but with very few glue notes and very few notes of varnish. Not at all harsh. Lots of white chocolate. Mashed banana. Hints of rum. Papaya. Mouth: the coconut goes on and on. Drier than most other grain whisky. Lots of cereals and oak. Cedar wood I would say. Nutmeg and mint. A very faint hint of burnt grass. Menthol in the aftertaste. Finish: rather short with the oak and vanilla having the last word.

A grain whisky that has a lot to say. The complexity is above par and the end result is better than many malt whiskies. One of the best grains I’ve had. Around € 120 but it seems to be sold out.

Score: 87/100


Port Askaig 30y

30 Jun 2010 | Caol Ila

The Port Askaig range has recently been expanded with a 30 year old expression. Although officially undisclosed, Port Askaig is really close to the Coal Ila distillery so we can assume the name is pointing in that direction.

 

Port Askaig 30 years Port Askaig 30 yo
(45,8%, Specialty Drinks 2009)

Nose: nicely coastal, with wet sand and oyster, but quite fruity as well. A soft, liqueur-like fruitiness, rather exotic for a Coal Ila. Nice interplay of two characters. Lemon, honeysuckle, vanilla. A few medicinal notes in the background. Mouth: lemon at first, then some walnuts and almonds. Apricots. Peat as well, and a few salty notes, which make it sharper than on the nose. Again a nice showcase of older Coal Ila elements. Finish: long, with spicy smoke, hints of tea and salty fish.

I’m fond of older Coal Ila. Port Askaig 25yo was already my favourite of the range and now this place is taken by the 30yo (although the 25yo has quite a price advantage).

Very elegant while at the same time showing impressive power for a 30 year-old. Marketed by The Whisky Exchange – around € 150.

Score: 89/100


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Coming up

  • Littlemill 1988 (Liquid Treasures)
  • Tomatin Cuatro series
  • Tomatin 1997 (Whisky-Fässle)
  • Ben Nevis 2002 (Port cask #334)
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Old Pulteney 1990 (lightly peated)

1623 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.