Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Sometimes I have a good laugh at all those crazy whisky prices. Take the Glenfiddich 33 yo 1975 / 2009 for example. Until a few days ago, this Dutch web site tried to sell it for € 1499 (claiming in a newsletter that this is a bargain as it has recently been auctioned for € 2835). At the same time, this French website still had stock at the more reasonable price of € 398. Right…

This aside, it should be an interesting bottle. The 1975 vintage was selected for the commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of the Glenfiddich visitor centre. It was drawn from cask #22000, a European oak sherry butt.


 

Glenfiddich 1975/2009 Vintage Glenfiddich 33 yo 1975
(53,7%, OB 2009, cask #22000, 520 btl.)

Nose: fruity and vibrant. Dried apricot, tangerine and quite some orange skin. Nicely balanced oak. Subtle vanilla. Dates. A rather subtle sherry cask, with slightly sour Mandarine Napoleon / orange oil notes which really lift the nose. Fruit cake. Nice old leather as well. Lovely. Mouth: develops on orange marmalade but it grows spicier, with cinnamon, a hint of pepper and nutmeg. Shows a good balance between the oak tannins (which are certainly present) and the fruity sweetness. Light vanilla again. Hints of liquorice in the end. Finish: oaky and spicy with some dark chocolate. Medium length.


A very good Glenfiddich with an individual nose and a palate with quite some oak, but nicely integrated with the rest of the flavours. Great subtle sherry influence. Thanks for the sample swap, Anthony!

Score: 91/100

ps/ Whiskysite.nl usually has good prices by the way, but this was just crazy. I just came back from vacation and I’ve noticed that both websites seem to have sold out very recently.


Edradour, part of the Signatory Vintage group since 2002, is famous for its finishes, so much that it’s almost impossible to say they have a house style.

This 1997 vintage has spent most of its time in regular hogsheads, but it received a second maturation in Sauternes casks. It’s bottled in the Straight from the Cask series, which means it’s single cask and cask strength.

 

Edradour 1997/2009 Sauternes Edradour 11 yo 1997 Sauternes finish (56,6%, OB 2009,
451 btl. 50 cl.)

Nose: starts malty with a background of sulphury organics and hints of rubber. After some breathing, it has some glorious moments in which the sweet wine sparkles and a lot of cinnamon emerges, together with some flowers. The more time you give it, the sweeter it gets, but it’s never really fresh. Water seems to help though, it enhances the flowery side and shows apricot notes. Mouth: fierce attack (duh). Now the fruitiness is nicer, with orange candy, peaches and hints of mint. Not as sweet as I had expected. Water is an improvement again – it brings a nice balance between honey and spices. Finish: dry, peppery and quite woody but still nicely candied as well.

A difficult one. It definitely needs water, but even then the organics are a bit disturbing. Around € 55.

Score: 66/100


Another independent 1970’s Glengoyne…  we’re not complaining! This bourbon barrel was bottled by Malts of Scotland and will only be available in Belgium (it has been selected by Luc Timmermans). Every bottle will be accompanied by a free miniature, nice!

The colour is slightly darker than the Glengoyne 1972 by The Nectar of the Daily Drams. Let’s put them side by side.

 

Glengoyne 1973 50.4% MoS Glengoyne 37yo 1973 (50,4%, Malts of Scotland 2010, cask #678, 97 btl.)

Nose: I sometimes make a dessert with mango, passion fruit, cape gooseberries and banana, marinated overnight in a syrup with vanilla, red peppers and star anise. Malts of Scotland has stolen my recipe! It seems warmer, sweeter and slightly more punchy than the Daily Dram version. I find less tangerine and papaya but more vanilla. Honeysuckle and tinned pineapple. Liquid candy really and hardly any trace of wood (except for the spices). When compared directly, the Daily Dram fruits seem greener. I prefer the candied MoS version but that’s a personal choice of course. Mouth: starts with a big oaky kick, quite resinous and slightly bittersweet. Fortunately the fruit basket bursts open as soon as you swallow. Overall less spicy than the DD. Hints of ginger and coconut. Finish: long and spicy, returning to sweet vanilla.

Another great 1970’s Glengoyne, full of fruits and utterly tropical. I preferred the Daily Dram over the previous cask by Malts of Scotland (#677), but this one overtakes them both, if only by a small margin. They’re both rather excellent so I’m not sure a 20% higher price is justified: around € 180.

Score: 92/100


Old Glen Grant is something you should never say ‘no’ to! Especially the 1970 and 1972 vintages are highly regarded (remember the MM Awards winning Glen Grant 1972 for The Whisky Fair?)

 

Glen Grant 1970 DT 3492 Glen Grant 39 yo 1970 (49,1%, Duncan Taylor 2009, cask #3492)

Nose: excellent fruitiness, very warm and sensual. Melon, yellow plums. Quite honeyed with frangipane notes. Gooseberries. Exotic mango. Baked banana. A lot of vanilla. It also shows waxy / solventy notes. Great! Great! Mouth: hmm, a slight overdose of oak now, although the same punchy fruit basket is still there. Hints of vanilla cake. Nutmeg, mint, soft pepper. Very spicy although not too tannic. I prefer it neat, because the fruits are a bit drowned with water. Finish: medium length on drying warm oak.

These old Glen Grants… will we ever get enough of them? This is a great cask again, although on the palate it’s a bit heavy on spicy oak. Anyway the nose is stunning. Well priced: around € 130, but probably sold out in most places.

Score: 91/100


Oban distillery is small, low-profile and there aren’t many releases. Independent bottlings are also hard to find. It is well respected and maybe slightly underrated.

OBAN distillery only NAS 2010This Oban is currently the ‘distillery exclusive’. Most distilleries have these kind of limited editions that are not distributed to shops and usually well priced. It’s a mixture of different casks that were 16 to 19 years old.

 

Oban NAS (55,2%, OB 2010, 
‘only available at the distillery’, 8999 btl.)

Nose: oily, with malt and zesty citrus and apple. A few coastal notes. Hay. Hints of peat in the background. After a while, it gets sweeter and more floral / candied notes show up. Oranges and grapefruit. Nice Highlands nose, albeit a little shy. Mouth: peaty, malty and quite spicy (cloves, pepper). A little chamomile. Sweet pears. Nice smoky ending. Finish: oaky and sugary. Medium length.

This Oban needs some time to unfold. A very firm dram with typical Highlands elements and a nice coastal touch.

Score: 86/100


This is a Springbank limited release, distilled in May of 1997. It was matured in refill bourbon barrels, then finished in fresh claret (Bordeaux) casks for
3 years and then another 2 years in re-charred casks (to smooth out the wine influence).

 

Springbank Claret Wood Springbank 12 yo ‘Claret Wood’
(54,4%, OB 2010, 9360 btl.)

Nose: immediately different. Rich, sirupy with a fresh, fruity side (redcurrant, raspberry, melon) but also a nice musty / coastal side. It even shows hints of coal smoke. Honey and figs. A little bit of mint. Hot sand? Reminiscent of the old Springbanks but in a modernized version. Very good and complex. Mouth: sweet and earthy at the same time. Orange liqueur and herbs. Old leather. A little ginger and pine resin. Again it seems to be a mixture of different styles, but it works very well. It seems to become less expressive when you add water though. Finish: long, slightly peppery with lingering fruits and a salty edge.

This is a big dram, with many layers and without any disturbing wine flavours. One of the best modern Springbank so far. Giving whisky a third maturation after a wine cask is not a bad idea!Recommended. Around € 45.

Score: 88/100


Quick news, related to the comments on the previous post…

GlenDronach single caskHere are some details about the second batch of GlenDronach single casks:

It’s good to see some sister casks and it would be very interesting to taste them side-by-side with the single cask releases of last year. In the meantime, have a look at the reviews of the first batch (2009) with the wonderful cask #719.


GlenDronach wood finish This August, four new GlenDronach releases will see the light of day. They’ve all received an additional finish in different types of casks, similar to what has been done at BenRiach over the last six years. The focus of GlenDronach will always be on sherry maturation though.

James CowanThese are the wood finishes:

  • GlenDronach 14 years Sauternes
  • GlenDronach 14 years Virgin Oak
  • GlenDronach 15 years Moscatel
  • GlenDronach 20 years Tawny Port

The Tawny Port and Moscatel versions were matured in European oak sherry casks before their 18 month finish, the other two were bourbon matured (American oak).

Although they were available at the Wild West Whisky Fest, I waited until their charming sales rep James Cowan presented them in a tasting at TastToe.

 

 

 

Please note that we’ve tasted samples at cask strength.
I’ve manually tried to dilute them to bottling strength (46%).

 

GlenDronach Sauternes 14yo GlenDronach 14 yo Sauternes (46%, OB 2010)

Nose: typical Sauternes influence: figs and melon with a buttery touch. Also a distinct hint of noble rot (botrytis) and flour. Apples with cinnamon. Honeysuckle. Mouth: sweet and honeyed with lots of barley sugar. Hints of vanilla and white chocolate. Finish: sweet, creamy and spicy.

This shares a lot of qualities with BenRiach 16yo Sauternes and should be a interesting alternative for Glenmorangie Nectar d’Or. Around € 50.

Score: 83/100

 

GlenDronach Virgin oak 14yo GlenDronach 14 yo Virgin Oak (46%, OB 2010)

Nose: this has striking hints of freshly sawn plywood. You know, the edge of the wood that is slightly burnt by the saw blade. It’s toasted, quite dry, with lots of vanilla and faint hints of glue. Nougat. Green banana. Actually quite pleasant. Mouth: spicy with hints of vanilla biscuits. Roasted peanuts. Nutmeg. Freshly sawn wood again. Finish: medium length and dry.

A peculiar profile with obvious woody notes. Not as good as the BenRiach Virgin Oak releases, but a nice introduction to the style. Around € 50.

Score: 81/100

 

GlenDronach Moscatel 15yoGlenDronach 15 yo Moscatel (46%, OB 2010)

This sample was remarkably hazy. Nose: rather citric. Fruity but in a vibrant, slightly sourish way. Think of rhubarb. Stewed fruits. Apple compote. Yellow raisins. Apple crumble with whipped cream. Old roses. Mouth: more or less the same combo of garden fruits and brown sugar. Cinnamon. Marmalade. Some tangerine and lots of toffee. Finish: grows more woody, malty and spicy. Nice evolution.

Well made, sweet, fruity and very zippy. Around € 55.

Score: 85/100

 

GlenDraonch Tawny Port 20yo GlenDronach 20 yo Tawny Port (46%, OB 2010)

Nose: much closer to the original GlenDronach style. Slightly vegetal sherry with mixed spices. Some honey. Blackcurrants. A light hint of smoke? Mouth: rich, with darker port notes but a nice acidity of sour cherries as well. Sultanas. Chocolate. Toffee. Slightly herbal towards the end. Finish: long, herbal and spicy.

This wood finish is a little closer to the common sherry releases with the port adding a deep fruitiness. Around € 80.

Score: 83/100

 

As a general remark, all of the wood finishes were pretty well made. None of them were too winey or cloying (none of them were exceptional either). GlenDronach has a kick start for these finishes thanks to the BenRiach experience.

 

Also in the line-up yesterday were the regular GlenDronach 15yo and 18yo, and the recent GlenDronach Grandeur which replaces the old 33 years old.

It’s interesting to note that the 15yo ‘Revival’ was a new batch which seemed less sulphury and less dirty than how I remember the first batch, with a bit more fresh fruits. I think they’ve done some nice tweaking.

On the other hand I’ve always preferred the 18yo ‘Allardice’ and this is still the case. It’s fresher, polished and more fragrant, with lovely raspberry and hints of tobacco. I need to review this in depth one day.

GlenDronach Grandeur was the winner of the evening according to the tasting public. I agree. For me, the 18yo came in second and the Moscatel was my favourite of the finishes. Most people preferred the Port finish though.


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Coming up

  • Benriach 1991 (MoS for QV.ID)
  • Craigellachie 17 Year Old
  • Glen Scotia 1992 (The Whiskyman)
  • Lagavulin 12yo (2014 release)
  • Balblair 2000 single casks
  • Ardmore Legacy
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Clynelish 21yo 1992 (Cadenhead)
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)

1639 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.