Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Wild West Whiskyfest Wild West Whisky Fest is probably the youngest whisky festival in Belgium, but after its first edition it already has a solid reputation. The 2009 edition was relatively small but all the major distributors and brands were present. The unique experiment in which the same whisky could be tasted blind with and without added caramel or chill-filtration, was a big hit as well.

The second edition will be held this weekend – June 5 and 6 in Kortrijk Xpo (1 to 6 pm).

Expect to find the new releases by Thosop, The Nectar, Malts of Scotland and other distributors (including those who were absent in Gent or Liège), but also expect a whole range of rare antiquities that you won’t find in stores (Lindores & Max Righi will be there). See you on Sunday?


The Coopers Choice Coopers Choice is a brand of the Vintage Malt Whisky Co, an independent bottler founded in 1992. They’re mostly known for Finlaggan and Ileach, their undisclosed Islay malts.

Auchentoshan 1991 Coopers ChoiceThe Coopers Choice range is a selection of single cask bottlings covering all ages and all regions of Scotland.


Auchentoshan 17 yo 1991
(43%, Coopers Choice 2009)

Nose: grassy and slightly cheesy. Mashed potatoes. Not really fruity, although it develops on nice lemon candy. A few hints of linseed oil. Too bad there’s not enough freshness to make the citrus stand out. Mouth: very sweet, lemon candy again. Hints of peppermint gum and pepper. Develops on grainy notes, like a flavoured vodka. Finish: sweet, grainy and slightly grassy.

Well, it didn’t impress me at all. One for real Auchentoshan fans perhaps? Around € 50.

Score: 56/100


Whisky Round Table

02 Jun 2010 | * News

Whisky Round Table A few weeks ago, fellow blogger Jason (GuidScotchDrink) invited me to be part of his Whisky Round Table. Each month, one question will be answered by 12 bloggers and the answers will be published on one of our blogs.

The first question is “What rules have you set for yourself in your whisky lives and how have you rationalized breaking them?”

As it turns out, most whisky lovers don’t have rules. Are we surprised…?
Read the full answers here.


Bruichladdich Pedro Ximinez The Bruichladdich Sherry Editions are interesting experiments in which the same whisky is finished in different sherry casks for two years.

For the 2008 edition they selected an Oloroso and a Manzanilla cask. Last year it was a Fino cask and a Pedro Ximénez cask from the Bodegas Fernando de Castilla (Ximinez is not exactly a misprint, but it’s not the common spelling either). I’m not sure if they have much more cask types to choose from, maybe a Palo Cortado or an Amontillado?

I was especially interested in the PX cask, as it has proven to get nice results. It’s the most luxurious and sticky kind of sherry.

Bruichladdich 1992 Pedro Ximinez Bruichladdich 17 yo 1992 ‘Sherry Edition 2 – Pedro Ximinez’ (46%, OB 2009, 6000 btl.)

Nose: honeyed sherry with fresh raspberry notes. Reminded me of Glenmorangie Sonnalta PX in a way. More oak though and slightly more vinous. Darker notes of blackcurrent. After a while, spices show up (ginger, cardamom). Mouth: pears poached in wine. Other fruits as well: plums, melon, strawberry marmalade… Quite sweet, thankfully the spices add more depth. Hints of nougat. Finish: lingering cardamom, raisins, oak and caramelized sugar.

The Pedro Ximénez has brought an intense sweetness and deep fruitiness to this whisky and the balance with the spirit is pretty good.
Around € 75.

Score: 85/100


Signatory Vintage This bottling actracted my interest because it said “matured in a wine treated butt”. I’m not sure what this means, but I suppose it’s an American oak butt that has been infused with sherry for a couple of weeks (without the wine actually being matured in this cask) before being filled with whisky.

Nowadays this practice is more common than you may know (‘real’ sherry casks are expensive), but it’s rarely mentioned as such. I really appreciate this kind of transparency.

Tim already raved about this one.

 

PELSIG1983_231 Port Ellen 27 yo 1983 (55,7%, Signatory Vintage 2010, cask #231, 501 btl.)

Nose: like an embering fire on a beach, that you’ve just fuelled with some diesel oil. Smokey and coastal. Sweet hints of almonds, or even better, almond butter cookies. Some wax and lemon. Hints of overripe fruits, could this be the wine influence? Quite medicinal as well. Really high-end. Water makes it a bit more feminine, with a tiny hint of vanilla, more wax and hints of fruity wine. Pretty awesome. Mouth: big and compact, peaty, sweet and salty at the same time. Pepper and citrus. Lots of iodine. Grows sharper over time. Very explosive. Here as well, water lifts the sweeter notes, mutes the peat and highlights some zesty citrus. Finish: peppery and grassy hints, fading on sweet peat smoke.


Don’t be fooled by the wine treatment, this is an exceptional Port Ellen that compromises very little. It’s great to play around with water and watch it switch between its monstruous peat side and its feminine vanilla side.

Not exactly cheap though: around € 190. Available from most international shops. Master of Malt also sells samples.

Score: 93/100


Bruichladdich is known for its ACE’d bottlings (additional cask enhancement) which are basically wine finishes. A couple of years ago, we already had a Blacker Still of which this is the successor.

The 19 years old Bruichladdich Black Art is a tribute to alchemy. It was finished in bourbon casks as well as different types of wine casks in warehouse n°12. The spectacular pink hue already informs you about the wine treatment.


Bruichladdich Black Art Bruichladdich 19yo 1989 ‘Black Art’ (51,1%, OB 2009, 6000 btl.)

Nose: definitely wine treated. Hints of port wine with sourish notes that remind me of cellars and of raspberry vinegar. Lots of red berries, strawberry marmalade, grapes, hints of cherry liqueur. A bit of musty oak as well. Enticing, but very very winey. Mouth: less fruity sweet than I expected although there is still berry juice to be found. Fresh, sour notes again, then some grapefruit, heavy wine and wood. Cooked strawberries. Finish: warm, quite long, winey.

This Bruichladdich won’t convert me to the dark religion of wine treatment, but it does show beautiful notes of red fruits. Thumbs up for the packaging by the way. Still available. Around € 80.

Score: 83/100


We’ve seen an unusual amount of independent Glengoyne 1972 releases lately. It started with the Glengoyne 1972 bottled by Malts of Scotland, then a second bottling from the same cask, a bottling by Jack Wiebers, one by The Whisky Agency and now this Glengoyne 1972 by The Bottler Formerly Known As Daily Dram. There have been great 1973 Glengoynes as well by the way.

It would have been interesting to have them all in a direct comparison, but for now it’s just this Daily Dram vs. the Malts of Scotland version.

 

Glengoyne 1972 37y Daily DramGlengoyne 37 yo 1972
(52%, Nectar of the Daily Drams 2010)

Nose: very fruity with tangerine, lemon, pineapple and hints of strawberries. A bit of mint. Very tropical and honeyed. Obviously in line with the Malts of Scotland version, but maybe a tiny bit fruitier, with a higher degree of vanilla. Less oaky spices as well. I prefer this Daily Dram version for having a wider array of flavours, but it’s close. Mouth: an oily attack, fruity with a pleasant acidity. The pineapple and honey are supported by more spices (ginger and cloves) and hints of resinous oak, but less so than in the Malts of Scotland release. Very nice integration. Water brings out soft coconut and some dried prunes. Slightly grassy aftertaste. Finish: long, spicy and drier.

An admirable Glengoyne with a delicious fruitiness and well balanced oak influence. I have a slight preference for this one over the 1972 Malts of Scotland version, although the differences are small. The lower price makes it even more interesting: around € 145. Recommended.

Score: 91/100


Goldlys is a Belgian distiller who uses malt, rye and maize as basic ingredients and both pot stills and column stills for the distillation of its whisky. They were the first to produce whisky in Belgium, and they have the oldest stocks.

Have a look at the previously reviewed Goldlys Limousin cask.

 

Goldlys Sherry Wood 1989 Goldlys 21 yo 1989 Sherry wood
(46%, OB 2010, 680 btl.)

Nose: the first thing I pick up – and quite strongly so – is Nivea cream. You know, the white, fat cream that our grandmothers use to moisturize their skin. Not bad, but rather unexpected. This fades after a while and makes place for notes of rye, oak polish and dried banana. A whiff of mint. There’s a sweet, fruitier side to it from the sherry, but overall it’s not really my kind of profile. Mouth: quite oaky and peppery with a big emphasis on the rye, so it seems. Green banana skin. Some eucalyptus and cloves. Not much sherry influence here. Finish: smooth but it drops very quickly.


This single cask Goldlys should arrive in stores as we speak, just in time for Father’s Day. If your dad likes rye whiskey (or some bourbons like Woodford Reserve), this could be an interesting gift with a nice wooden box. If he’s into single malts, then you’re taking quite a risk. Around € 30.

Score: 71/100


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Coming up

  • SIA Blended Scotch
  • Ardmore Legacy
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Clynelish 21yo 1992 (Cadenhead)
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)

1644 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.