Single malt whisky - tasting notes

It’s a nice concept: visitors of the Spirits in the Sky festival could attend a masterclass by independent bottler Duncan Taylor and select the next single cask bottling for Belgium. This Glen Grant 1974 was chosen over four other cask samples (Caperdonich 1972, Royal Lochnagar 1986, Glenlivet 1970 and Macduff 1969).

Duncan Taylor has a whole series of 1970/1972/1974 Glen Grant casks, and a lot of the subsequent numbers (#16569 up to #16582) have already been bottled (but apparently none of the 1974’s are as good as the excellent 1972’s and 1970’s).

DSC08716 Glen Grant 35 yo 1974 (55,2%, Duncan Taylor 2009 for The Nectar, cask #16582, 168 btl.)

Nose: a bit shy at first, it needs some hand warmth to show its full potential. Fruity of course, with tangerine, lemon, apples… Rich honey and a bit of marzipan. A nice oakiness. Not as much oak polish as in the Glen Grant 1972 for The Whisky Fair, as far as I can remember. Mouth: cooked fruits with hints of vanilla. Less tropical than I expected. Honey. Marmalade. Significantly more spicy than on the nose with the oakiness becoming very noticeable (but still within limits). Finish: rather long, drying with lots of spices.

This Glen Grant 1974 is not as great as I hoped it would be. It’s very good however, and based on reviews of its sister casks, I think this is the best of the series. It turns out 1974 was a slightly lesser year than 1972 or 1970 for this distillery maybe? Around € 130.

Score: 86/100

ps/ The box contains an error. The bottle says “cask 16582″ but the certificate says “cask 16882″.


Last year we saw the release of a new Springbank 18 years old. It was matured mainly in sherry casks and it was received very well by reviewers.

I was told it contained quite a lot of older whisky. In fact 21yo would have been a more accurate name. This year, there’s a new version limited at 9000 bottles with the same cask distribution (80% sherry, 20% bourbon). It’s likely to sell out really soon.

 

Springbank 18 yo Springbank 18y (46%, OB 2010)

Nose: it takes a while to open up, but it’s clear the berries are the key element again. Blueberries, strawberries… an unusual but very enjoyable fruit mix. Underneath is a darker layer of roasted grains, very gentle smoke and hints of marzipan and vanilla. A slightly earthy / dusty edge as well, which makes it a classic Springbank. While it’s still very balanced and entertaining, I remember last year’s release to be more expressive and complex. Mouth: same remark, it seems rather tame. Quite oily with the sherry standing out a bit (dried fruits, some spices, nuts). Slightly bittersweet. A hint of smoke. Finish: medium length but really nice, with notes of blueberries, chocolate and spices.

While it’s still a good whisky, I was underwhelmed by this new version. Maybe it’s the power of imagination (I didn’t have a chance to taste them head-to-head), but the new version seems to be playing in a lower league. Quite expensive: around € 100.

Score: 84/100


Redbreast 15yo In December 2009 a new batch of the acclaimed Redbreast 15 Years old was launched. Four years earlier, the first edition was bottled to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of La Maison du Whisky.

The new release caused a lot of joy (and high expectations) among the fans of Irish whiskey. This inspired me to do a direct comparison between the old and the new edition. The 2009 release is already available from European retailers and the US will get it towards the end of the year.

I’ve already reviewed its younger brother, the Redbreast 12 Years at 40%.



Redbreast 15 yo (46%, OB 2005)

Nose: very crisp grapefruit with sweeter notes of peach and honey. Fresh and playful. Whiffs of cut grass. Vanilla and a pinch of cinnamon. Coconut and pineapple. Papaya. A slight waxiness. Very Irish. Mouth: gentle and accessible. Again very much on grapefruit, growing spicier with hints of caramel. Some banana and citrus. A bit floral as well. Not the most complex but certainly very sippable. Finish: medium length. Delicate fruits with vanilla and hints of cocoa.

Score: 85/100


Redbreast 15 yo (46%, OB 2009)

Nose: starts in a flatter way, the fresh grapefruit and tropical fruitiness of the 2005 edition is almost gone. More cereals, more dust, more toffee. Camomile? Quite rubbery as well. Hints of nougat. After a while, fruit confit comes through, but very restrained. Mouth: basically the same differences: more spices (gingerbread, cardamom), less fruit (some bramble maybe). The stunning clarity of the 2005 release doesn’t repeat itself in this 2009 version. More green, vegetal notes. Finish: medium length with hints of gooseberry and hints of vanilla.

Score: 81/100

 

One thing I’ve learned is that the original Redbreast 15yo is a perfect example of a fruity and accesible Irish whiskey. The new 15yo – although still enjoyable – fails to live up to the standard set by the previous edition. Around € 65.

Redbreast 15yo (2005)

– tropical fruitiness
– fresh and delicate
– stunning clarity
Redbreast 15yo (2009)

– restrained ripe fruits
– less fresh, slightly dusty
– seems older

Jason at Guid Scotch Drink asked me to write a guest post in his excellent ‘Say what?’ series. I tried to explain how some whiskies expose farmy notes (as you may know, I’m a big fan of subtle cow stable and manure in whisky). I wanted to publish an example of a farmy whisky and Brora 30 Years old is a perfect illustration.

 

Brora 30yo 2007 edition Brora 30yo (55,7%, OB 2007,
6th Edition, 2958 btl.)

Nose: what did you expect? Farmy! Soft peat smoke and charcoal but also cows, manure and interesting notes of goat cheese. Horse saddle leather. Tobacco. Fresh sea breeze. Sharper notes of balm, hay, a bit of yeast… Fern forest. Camphor. Not very fruity, although I pick up soft yellow apple and citrus. Water makes it rounder and brings out a hint of vanilla sweetness. Truly unique. Mouth: very powerful and immediately maritime, with a briney hint of liquorice. Quite dry and oily. A sharp hint of mustard. Much more peated and smoked now. Takes water very well, with added notes of apple, lemon pie and ginger. Finish: long, hints of liquorice, bonfire smoke and pepper.

I can’t stop loving this one, and the 2004 edition is even better. A powerful peaty palate and a complex, balanced nose. If you’re serious about whisky, Brora 30yo is something you should have tasted. Still available, around € 275.

Score: 94/100


Craigellachie is a very active distillery, running at full capacity. It has recently opened a huge storage facility where eventually more than 10 warehouses will hold over half a million casks for the owner (Dewars) as well as for Diageo.

This Craigellachie 1984 (ex-bourbon cask) is part of the latest series by The Whisky Agency (Flowers theme). It’s a joint bottling with Daily Dram.

 

backgroundcg1 Craigellachie 25 yo 1984 (53,7%, The Whisky Agency Daily Dram 2009, Flowers series, 256 btl.)

Nose: starts fresh and fruity, on yellow plum, orange and grapefruit. Quite floral as well (pollen and nectar). Very creamy with notes of vanilla cream. Vanilla cupcakes and marshmallow. Latte Macchiato. Big notes of wood shavings and wax. A little leather. Some pineapple sweets after warming up. An excellent profile! Mouth: rather sweet, again lots of creamy notes mixed with vanilla and citrus tea. Yellow plums are back. Some ripe banana and apricot. Lemon. Kiwi. Frangipane. More spices now with a herbal development, really nice. Finish: spicy oak (pepper and resin), fading out on vanilla and moccha.

This Craigellachie is very fruity with a perfect amount of wood and spices. Warmly recommended, but almost sold out now. Around € 115.

Score: 91/100


Over the last few years, Tomatin had a makeover. A couple of years ago, there was just a standard 10 Year old, but nowadays they have a whole range of bottlings (12, 15, 18, 25, 30 and 40 Years old).

This single cask Tomatin 1980 was released in 2008.

 

Tomatin 1980 single cask 994 Tomatin 1980
(47,4%, OB 2008, cask #994, 172 btl.)

Nose: fresh start. Fruity notes (peaches, cherries) with marshmallow. Lovely passion fruits. Citrus. Some unripe banana and pineapple. Lots of vanilla. Gets a bit creamy after a while, absolutely delicious. Liquid dessert. Mouth: basically the same story with lots of fruits and notes of bubblegum and honey. Not far from some Irish profiles, but more complex I would say. Added hints of pink grapefruit. Unripe mango. Tropical but without the warmth or the sweetness that goes with it. Fresh, fruity, malty (hints of cereals) and slightly mineral. Finish: not too long. A bit more spicy notes (whiffs of ginger and cinnamon) and certainly sweeter.

A very nice Tomatin. Not cheap (around € 180) but really beautiful. Samples are available at Whiskysamples.eu

Score: 89/100


As you know, BenRiach is a Speyside distillery with a tradition of making peated batches as well. The Whisky Exchange bottled quite a few BenRiach from the 1980’s in their Single Malts of Scotland range, and most of them were really worthwhile.

This BenRiach 1984 won a silver award at the 2008 Malt Maniacs Awards.

 

BenRiach 1984/2008 SMOS BenRiach 23 yo 1984 (54,2%, SMoS 2008, cask #194, 214 btl.)

Nose: clearly a peated version, even though it’s not at all monstrous. Nice dark ashes. Smoked ham. Surprisingly coastal for a BenRiach, with tarry ropes and whiffs of sea air. Nonetheless it’s beautifully balanced with marmalade and honey which makes this one very attractive. Hints of diesel oil. Waves of citrus. Very entertaining. Mouth: very thick and powerful. Much more peated. Really dark, almost like burnt whisky. Lots of pepper (red chilli even) but again there’s a sweet coating. Finish: a bit drier, with coal and diesel oil. Hints of liquorice.

A high quality peated Speysider, very muscular. I really loved the nose, too bad I find the peat a tad overpowering on the palate. Sold out (around € 75 at the time so great value for money).

Score: 87/100


Glenrothes 1994

15 Feb 2010 | Glenrothes

The Glenrothes 1994 vintage has been around since 2006, at least in Europe. In the States, it was introduced at the beginning of this year and it will hit the shelves any moment now. I guess the US version is still the same batch because the label says “distilled Oct 94 – approved Apr 06”.

The 1994 vintage was composed as a lighter, stimulating and uplifting expression of The Glenrothes.

 

Glenrothes 1994 Glenrothes 1994 (43%, OB 2008)

Nose: the first few seconds are filled with buttery toffee which is typical for The Glenrothes. After that, a wave of zesty lemon shows up and make it a lot fresher. Its spring-character shows juicy pears and orange fruit gums with a touch of vanilla. Very citric. Lemon pie. Slightly flowery with hints of Cif (the cleaning cream). None of the spices that we see in older Glenrothes bottlings. Mouth: rather weak and watery. Quite malty with a fruity layer of fresh plums. Hints of hazelnuts in the aftertaste. Finish: not very long and quite soft. Pears. Light ginger and nuts.

On the nose, this is the closest to a Lowlander that The Glenrothes will probably ever get (although the trademark toffee is still there). Great to see such a variation on the distillery profile. Probably very teasing as a summer dram, although I prefer the spicier profile. A higher alcohol volume could make it more punchy as well. Around € 55.

Score: 82/100


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Coming up

  • SIA Blended Scotch
  • Ardmore Legacy
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Clynelish 21yo 1992 (Cadenhead)
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)

1644 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.