Single malt whisky - tasting notes

Yoichi (written 余市) won the 2008 edition of the World Whisky Awards so we already know they deliver great stuff. Yoichi is a Nikka distillery known for their peated bottlings.

This 18 Years old Yoichi 1991/2009 was matured in a virgin oak cask, which should make for a spicy dram.

 

Yoichi 1991/2009 LMdW Nikka Yoichi 1991 (58%, OB 2009 for La Maison du Whisky, new oak cask #129374, 453 btl.)

Nose: Houston, we have a winner! Really, just smell this and you’ll be instantly intrigued. Very waxy and honeyed, with floral notes as well as sweeter notes of peaches. Vanilla scented candles. Big big notes of honeydew melon! There’s also a woody side to it (sawdust), with spicy notes of cinnamon and ginger lemonade. Curiously farmy as well. Hints of leather armchairs. Mouth: rather hot at first and very spicy, with a peppery kick. The peat is more noticeable now, but not predominant at all. A touch of smoke. Salty undertones. Getting sweeter with nice hints of yellow raisins. Well balanced with the wood. Finish: long and warming. A round chocolate sweetness with tangerines and the lightest hint of peat.

Very complex and beautiful. It’s intense in different ways: the sweetness, the spiciness, the wood… they’re all very powerful and coated with gentle peat. Impressive. Around € 120.

Score: 92/100


Hakushu (written 白州 and pronounced Hak-shoo) is part of the Suntory group and was built in 1973 in the Southern Japanese Alps. It’s high above sea level, twice as high as Scotland’s highest distillery (Dalwhinnie).

This Hakushu 1989 single cask comes from a sherry butt, which is very rare (it’s probably the second single cask sherry release ever). It has a very dark, mahogany colour.

 

Hakushu 1989 50021 TWE Hakushu 20 yo 1989 (62%, OB 2009 for The Whisky Exchange, sherry butt #9O 50021)

Nose: a bit restrained at first, but it opens up with big sherry notes of course. Excellent plums and raisins but also lovely fresh, sweet/sour notes of tangerines and bramble liqueur. Fragrant honey. Balanced wood influence: it’s certainly there but it never overpowers. Water brings out a hint of smoked wood. Mouth: hot and woody at cask strength but very rich. Spicy cake (some cinnamon and ginger). Plums again. Definitely from a clean sherry cask (why do the Japanese always seem to pick perfect casks?). The sandalwood gives it a dry and tannic edge, maybe even a few rubbery hints. Finish: quite long and smooth. Warming sherry with a sweet aftertaste.

A perfectly balanced sherry bomb – a Japanese Macallan, as it were. On the other hand, I still prefer the Longmorn 1969, which is just as sherried but less dry and more complex (although it’s older). This Hakushu 1989 is one of the Gold Medal winners that is still available from TWE (around € 200).

Score: 90/100


Malt Maniacs Awards It has been a while since the Malt Maniacs Awards 2009 were announced, so it’s time we investigate the bottlings that won this year’s awards.

These releases won a Gold Award:

Some of them have already been reviewed here but I’ll fill in the missing pieces in the next couple of days. This promises to be a week with high scores!


After the first Inaugural release of Kilchoman, this new version was released a couple of weeks ago.

It has been matured for three years in first fill and refill bourbon casks bought from Buffalo Trace. After that, it was finished in oloroso butts for two and a half months and vatted with non-finished (ex-bourbon) Kilchoman. Kudos to the distillery for explaining precisely what’s in the bottle.

Kilchoman 3yo - second autumn release

Kilchoman 3yo 2006 ‘Autumn 2009 release’ (46%, OB 2009, 10.000 btl.)

Nose: starts in a similar way as the first release, but it doesn’t take long before this one shows more fruit. Another (small) step away from the new-make notes. Firm peat and extinguished cigarette notes, but also more maritime hints this time. More pepper as well. Hints of black olives. Faint whiffs of cinnamon and caramelized ginger – the start of spicy notes developed by the wood! Interesting how it constantly switches from sweet to savoury flavours while swirling the glass. Mouth: fat, oily peat. It doesn’t seem to get much grip though, the attack of the Inaugural release seems stronger to me. Some sweeter notes, fading quickly and making way for a very dry bitterness that evolves to soapy notes in the aftertaste. A bit strange and not entirely my taste. Finish: rather earthy peat with hints of nutmeg.

On the nose: perfectly enjoyable with an impressive mixture of sweet, candied notes and briney peat. On the palate, I felt disappointed with the soapiness as an off-note for me. Better than the Kilchoman 3yo Inaugural release, but no match for the Kilchoman single cask for LMdW. Around € 55.

Score: 79/100

Kilchoman 3yo
Inaugural release

– clear hints of new-make
– artificial fruitiness
– too ashy
– mono-dimensional
Kilchoman 3yo
Autumn release

– hardly any new-make notes
– pleasantly fruity and spicy
– too soapy
– more complex

Kornog is the peated version of the Glann ar Mor whisky. This French distillery is located in Brittany, a region which has quite a lot of Celtic influence.

This is the first cask ever bottled of the peated spirit. Their (Scottish) malt has been peated to 35 ppm and matured in ex-bourbon barrels for three years. It’s very limited and hard to find with prices ranging from € 35 to € 75 for the same bottle!

 

Kornog Glann Ar Mor Glann ar Mor ‘Kornog Taouarc’h Kentan’ (57,1%, OB 2008, first release)

Nose: very fresh, citrusy peat with light smoke and big notes of marzipan. A nice fruitiness as well (pears on syrup, pineapple sweets), slightly bubblegummy but very nicely so. There’s also a noticeable medicinal side (iodine, bandages) which gives it kind of a young Ardbeg profile. Hints of seaweed, rather faint but I hope this will become stronger after a couple of extra years in the maritime Breton climate. Give this dram some time and you’ll even notice some farmy notes and some garage smells. Mouth: interesting flavours of marzipan again, with some pear and kiwi. Definitely more smokey than on the nose. Lemon. Hints of vanilla. Growing saltier towards the end. Finish: very ashy with a big woody kick. Lots of peat.

Compared to other young peat bottlings like Kilchoman 3yo, this is more balanced (read: less peaty), more complex and surprisingly mature. Very enjoyable.

Score: 84/100


Berry Brothers & Rudd (BBR) is one of the oldest wine importers in the UK. They are the official distributor of The Glenrothes, and they have their own range of “Berry’s own Selection” bottlings. They’re all single cask releases (or at least very small batches).

This Longmorn is rather legendary, especially in Belgium. Some of our Malt Maniacs discovered this in Paris and advised the Belgian importer to make it available. A wise decision, as we will see.

 

Untitled-1 Longmorn 1990/2005
(46%, Berry Bros. 2005, cask #30111 & 30112)

Nose: very fragrant nose. Peach, grapefruit, strawberry. Fresh lemon. Cooked apple. Sweet and fruity, but there’s a lot more going on. Some vanilla. Mint. Milk chocolate with nuts. Dried flowers. A delicate layer of smoke. Hints of wax. What a wonderful complexity! Mouth: sweet and direct. Quite floral as well. Notes of herbal tea and citrus. Vanilla custard. Grapefruit again. Almonds. Light smoke. Banana. Finish: the same beat keeps going: vanilla, grapefruit and almonds, mixed with light peat smoke. Rather light in the end.

The nose is to die for. The mouth and finish keep developing the same flavours in endless variations. Around € 50 at the time. Now impossible to find. Damn!

Score: 91/100


If your name is Jean-Pierre, Veerle, Rowin, Bert or Arnaut, then you can expect an e-mail from me soon. You’re probably on the guest list for the upcoming Whisky Festival in Gent. See you on Sunday maybe?

The Connemara samples go to Pavlos (Greece), André (France) and three Belgians: Walter, Hans and Geert. You’ll have to be patient, because I will only be able to send them out after the festival.

Congratulations to the winners, and thanks everyone for taking part.


Bruichladdich is known for its extensive range of bottlings. Links is a series of limited edition bottlings, launched in 2003 and chosen by Jim McEwan, celebrating Scotland’s two major passions: whisky and golf. All of the Links series have been bottled deliberately at 14 years, providing an interesting comparison of different cask types and finishes.

The first release in the Links series was this ‘Old Course – St. Andrews’, matured in Spanish Oak casks. Later releases are Augusta, Turnberry, Troon, Torrey Pines, K Club, Hoylake, Carnoustie… There’s also a miniature version that is included in some Bruichladdich 3×5 cl tasting packs.

 

Bruichladdich Links - Old Course St. Andrews Bruichladdich Links 14y
‘The Old Course, St. Andrews – 17th hole’ (46%, OB 2003, 1st release)

Nose: very fragrant. Interesting combination of sweet exotic fruit and a salty whiff of sea air. Peach, kumquat, apple candy. Passion fruit. Mango. Fruit syrup and orange marmalade. A touch of mint and a hint of smoke. Very good. Mouth: oily delivery. The fruit is more subdued now, but still candied with some orange peel and apple. More smoke. Rather short, but warm finish.

I was really impressed by the nose but the palate didn’t deliver in the same way. Overall nice balance. A few stores around the world still sell this one. Around € 35 (50 cl).

Score: 84/100


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Coming up

  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Benriach 1991 (MoS for QV.ID)
  • Blair Athol 1991 (Wemyss Malts)
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)
  • Ardbeg 15yo 1973 (Sestante)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)
  • Balblair Millennium

1638 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.