Single malt whisky - tasting notes

The Mountain of Gold is the tallest peak of the island. This Jura Paps was finished in Pinot Noir (Bourgogne) wine casks. It is one of the more difficult grapes to deal with but it has a complex aroma of black cherries and cinnamon. Sometimes there are hints of mushrooms or barnyard.

Jura Paps - Mountain of Gold - Barolo Jura Paps ‘Mountain of Gold’ (46%, OB 2009, Pinot Noir finish, 1366 btl.)

Nose: slightly more dusty, with indeed some hints of mushrooms in the distance. Apart from that, lots of cocoa. Almonds and violets. Generally a more spicy profile. Mouth: rather spicy (aniseed, slightly peppery), the most prickly of the trio. Blackberry marmelade. Hints of tobacco and liquorice. Finish: slightly more woody. Drying and peppery.

Personally I think this one has the biggest influence of grapes. It didn’t impress me as much as the other two. Around € 100.

Score: 75/100


The name ‘Beinn A’Chaolais’ comes from the narrow water channel between the island of Jura and Islay. This Jura Paps was finished in Bordeaux wine casks (Cabernet Sauvignon). This grape variety has a distinct aroma of green peppers or asparagus caused by the pyrazine molecules.

 

Jura Paps ‘Mountain of the Sound’ 
(46%, OB 2009, Cabernet Sauvignon finish, 1366 btl.)

Jura Paps - Mountain of Sound - Cabernet SauvignonNose: very fruity again, but this one has a slightly nuttier / woodier profile. Hints of blackcurrant and cedar wood with almonds with whiffs of milk chocolate. Cantaloupe (hami melon). Cloves. Mouth: obvious red wine taste. Spicy taste. Orangettes (chocolate covered orange candy), toffee. Sweet and honeyed. Nutmeg towards the end. Finish: spicy cake aroma, nutmeg and chocolate again.

Isle of Jura really managed to get the wine finish right, which is not at all an obvious achievement. In general I’m not a big fan of wine finishes, but this is interesting. Around € 100.

Score: 80/100


The Jura PapsBeinn Shiantaidh’ was finished in Barolo wine casks. The name of this peak is derived from local rumours that it hides the remains of the Lords of the Isles. Barolo is an Italian wine, one of many to claim the title “Wine of the Kings”. It is produced from the Nebbiolo grape and is known for its characteristic aromas of tar and roses.

 

Jura Paps ‘Sacred Mountain’
(46%, OB 2009, Barolo finish, 1366 btl.)

Jura Paps - Sacred Mountain - BaroloNose: fragrant and fruity. You certainly notice the grapes but they’re well integrated. Notes of red berries, tangerine and oranges. Pomegrenate. Lots of floral notes as well: rose water, honeysuckle, some lavender. Really elegant. Mouth: sweet. Slightly more wood influence now, and caramel (natural I guess). Toffee, still some berries and oranges covered in chocolate. Finish: sweet with some wood but still nicely balanced. Not too long though.

I like the nose very much. The typical Barolo aroma of rose petals works very well. Around € 100 which is too expensive though.

Score: 82/100


Isle of Jura - Jura Paps whiskyIn June 2009, Jura Distillery launched a limited edition of 3 single malts inspired by the Paps of Jura mountains that dominate the skyline of the island.

The trio is 15 years old and finished in different types of wine casks.

  • Jura Paps ‘Beinn An Oir’
    Mountain of Gold: Pinot Noir finish
  • Jura Paps ‘Beinn A’Chaolais’
    Mountain of Sound: Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Jura Paps ‘Beinn Shiantaidh’ 
    The Sacred Mountain: Barolo finish 

Only 1366 bottles are released, signed by Master Distiller Willie Cochrane. If you buy the full set (€ 300), there is a fancy case that holds the three individual boxes. Stay tuned for reviews of the set.


I will be on vacation until the end of this month. No worries, I have prepared a bunch of reviews that will be automatically published while I’m away:


A couple of weeks ago, I made a city trip to Valencia (Spain) and stayed in the Hilton Valencia (now Meliã Valencia). Their Podium bar had a decent range of +/- 40 single malt whiskies, the crown jewel being a Linkwood 1954 G&M (€ 58 for 4cl – quite outrageous but at least it’s excellent whisky – the others had a more reasonable price by the way). I decided to try a Millburn 1976, bottled by Gordon & MacPhail in their Connoisseurs Choice range.

Millburn distillery was originally know as “Inverness distillery” and was mothballed in 1985. In 1988, it was destroyed and the site now houses a restaurant. There was an original bottling in the Rare Malts series, and a few releases from independent bottlers. This Millburn 1976 is from a refill sherry butt.

Millburn 1976 G&MMillburn 27yo 1976
(46%, Gordon & MacPhail 2004)

Nose: very rich. Starts rather perfumy on white peach, lavender and dried apricots. Develops some dusty notes over time (incense, old books). Some very light smoke in the background. Linseed oil. Quite complex. Mouth: malty start. Very spicy and peppery development, rather hot. Some peat smoke. Dry walnuts. Charred oak. Finish: sweet start with spices (nutmeg). Getting drier in the end (cloves, sherry wood).

Interesting stuff. Not perfect, but very complex and rewarding, especially on the nose. On the palate, it’s not really dynamic. Not available any more.

Score: 85/100


Redbreast 12yo

09 Jul 2009 | * Ireland

Redbreast is not a single malt, but pure pot still whiskey. It’s made from a mixture of both malted and unmalted barley. It’s not strictly a blend either, because the mixture is distilled at once instead of blending them afterwards. Although it’s typically Irish, nowadays the tradition is taken over by malt whiskey.

 

Redbreast 12yo Redbreast 12y (40%, OB 2008)

Nose: creamy and fruity. Pear, banana and peach, with a layer of sweet honey. A bit of marzipan. Very rich vanilla pudding. Fresh cake and hints of sherry. Slightly waxy. Some red pepper in the distance. Mouth: oily mouth-feel, fruity again (cassis, strawberry). Coconut with peach. Gingery notes as well. Finish: growing spicier with hints of liquorice. Pears and honey. Quite some nutmeg, and a slightly winey aftertaste.

The nose is very attractive. On the palate it slows down a bit, but it’s still a very decent Irish whiskey at a great price.

Around € 35.

Score: 83/100


This 12 year-old Talisker was bottled in 2007 but it re-appeared in some FOTCM stores a few weeks ago. It seems they didn’t manage to sell all of their bottles? This release was matured in European Oak.

 

Talisker 12y Classic MaltsTalisker 12yo (45,8%, OB 2007, for Friends of Classic Malts, 21.500 btl.)

Nose: unmistakably Talisker. Grilled notes, freshly baked bread. Some peat. Hints of sherry, a wee bit of sulphur maybe. Some spices, mostly pepper and chilli. Slightly maritime (sea-weed, oily fish). Mouth: in the same league as the standard Talisker 10yo, but sweeter at first. Honey. Spices and toasted notes. Sugar coated nuts. White pepper. Hints of mustard. Finish: getting more salty. Slightly peaty and smokey. Some sweet oak influence.

Compared to the standard Talisker 10yo, this one is a little less spicy with a more generous dash of honey. Creamy but not really worth the extra cash.

Score: 82/100


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Coming up

  • SIA Blended Scotch
  • Ardmore Legacy
  • Cardhu 18 Year Old
  • Clynelish 21yo 1992 (Cadenhead)
  • Ledaig 2005 (Maltbarn)
  • Aberlour 8yo (cube, small cork)

1644 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.