Single malt whisky - tasting notes

In March 2013, Tullibardine announced a total makeover of its single malt range – a logical move after the distillery had been sold to the French Picard company. In line with the state of the whisky market, most of them are NAS (no age statement) versions.

 

Tullibardine whisky

 

Tullibardine Sovereign is the new entry level expression. This is a first fill bourbon barrel matured version. There’s also an aged 20 and 25 year old, as well as three ‘core’ finishes: 225 Sauternes, 228 Burgundy and 500 Sherry. The numbers relate to the size of the casks in this case.

 

 

Tullibardine SovereignTullibardine Sovereign (43%, OB 2013)

Nose: malty nose with pear drops and creamy white chocolate. Fresh cereal notes. Vanilla custard. Very soft gristy and mineral notes. Undemanding, modern whisky. Mouth: still very malty. Lots of apples and pears. Quite a lot of spicy notes now: cinnamon, pepper, mint and ginger. A faint potpourri edge as well. Finish: medium long, more malt and ginger, with soft nutty notes.

Even though it’s slightly uninspired, this is not an entry level whisky to be ashamed of. It’s a fresh and properly made spirit, which was not always the case for previous distillery bottlings. Around € 35.

Score: 79/100


After the split of Douglas Laing in May 2013, with both brothers going their own way, there are now two companies Douglas Laing (Fred + daughter) and Hunter Laing (Stewart + sons). The popular Old Malt Cask range is part of the Hunter Laing portfolio.

This Aberlour 2000 was actually bottled before the breakup.

 

Aberlour 2000 Douglas LaingAberlour 12 yo 2000
(50%, Douglas Laing ‘Old Malt Cask’ 2013, refill hogshead, ref. 9340, 312 btl.)

Nose: juicy barley, with a few gristy and mineral notes and plenty of apples and pears. Sweet cereals. Light heather honey. Yellow raisins. Hints of vanilla cream. A pretty standard, fresh and modern nose for a young and bourbon matured Speysider. Mouth: really sweet, lots of marzipan and cooked fruits at first. Melon and honey. Quickly joined by café latte notes and brown candy sugar. A little toffee. Hints of coffee sweets. Still some mineral / waxy notes. Fades on citrus zest and herbs, with a peppery edge. Finish: quite long, zesty, with a slight herbal bitterness and liquorice.

I think the switch from bright, fruity notes on the nose to sweet latte and coffee sweets on the palate was really nice. Overall youngish but quite enjoyable. Around € 60.

Score: 86/100


Tamdhu 10 years

01 Aug 2013 | Tamdhu

Tamdhu distillery had a rebirth at the latest Speyside festival, after being bought by Glengoyne. The first two releases are this new Tamdhu 10 years and a limited edition Tamdhu 10yo 100% first fill sherry. Sandy Couts, the previous distillery manager at Glenrothes, is now running the distillery.

It’s a slight disappointment to see range makeovers and still end up with alcohol volumes of 40%. I thought we had evolved to 43% or rather 46% by now, even for standard releases?

The new Tamdhu 10 years was assembled using sherry wood, a combination of European and American oak casks, with quite some first fill barrels in the mix.

 

Tamdhu 10 yearsTamdhu 10 yo (40%, OB 2013)

Nose: there’s a nice smoothness to this nose, with quite some vanilla cake and raisin notes to it. Latte notes and honey coated almonds. Some juicy apples. Closely related to Glenrothes, or so it seems. Unfortunately there’s also a significant amount of rubber. It comes and goes but it’s hard to miss. A bit sad for an otherwise very attractive nose. Mouth: medium weight (better than the 40% suggested I must say), with a lot of caramel and citrus notes now, both oranges and lime. Vanilla and soft ginger. Quite a big malty core as well. Cocoa. Finish: medium long, playing the spicy card now. Pepper and grassy notes with a nice berry note in the aftertaste.

Definitely a nice entry-level malt and a good rebirth of the brand. Though blemished by some rubber and a slight lack of punch on the nose, it’s an elegant composition of first fill and refill sherry. Around € 35.

Score: 82/100


I remember the Port Charlotte 2001 released in 2011 by Malts of Scotland  (ref. 11017) said white Rioja on its label. Now there’s only Rioja hogshead so I wonder whether that means it’s red or simply undisclosed? Maybe it’s irrelevant anyway.

This bottle was presented at the 2013 Limburg Festival, but due to a printing error (“bourbon barrel”) the label had to be redone.

 

 

Port Charlotte 2001 - Malts of ScotlandPort Charlotte 11 yo 2001 (57,5%, Malts of Scotland 2013, rioja hogshead, MoS 13027, 358 btl.)

Nose: lots of capers with salted butter. Smoked fish, classic smoked salmon with a honey / mustard dressing. Sandy beaches. Some flax rope. Behind this Islay front are plenty of candied notes, marzipan and berries which make it more playful than the official releases. Quite some waxy notes as well. Mouth: very peaty, clean and coastal. Brine, the smoked fish again, hints of oysters. Not as sweet as the nose suggested, although there is some sweet citrus and a slight toffee note. Picks up a lot of salt and liquorice along the way. Finish: long, slightly candied again and still very smoky.

It’s difficult to fault one of these recent Port Charlottes (the price maybe). They are simply very well-made and they withstand even the most uncommon kinds of casks. Around € 105.

Score: 88/100


In the context of the recent revamp of Talisker, there’s this new Port wine finished version called Talisker Port Ruighe (prononuced portree).

Matured in refill casks (American and European oak), it was then transferred to deeply charred barrels and yet again transferred to Port wine (or Port wine infused) barrels.

 

Talisker Port RuigheTalisker Port Ruighe
(45,8%, OB 2013)

Nose: rather dominant wine notes. Think rosewater lokum, a lot of plums and cranberries. Fragrant lemon as well as a slightly acetic sourness. Some chalk. The peat is nicely integrated and is particularly medicinal with the invasiveness of menthol and antiseptics. Coastal notes. Hints of chocolate and oak shavings. Uncommon and surprisingly airy for a Talisker. Mouth: oily but sharp as a knife. Brine, chilli pepper, ginger. Cranberries (including the specific bitterness of their juice). Menthol again. It’s only in the aftertaste that it begins to calm down and show orange liqueur, smoke. There’s also a surprisingly scorched earthy element in the end. Finish: long, with more smoke, dark chocolate and earthy notes.

An unusual Talisker to say the least. Some will find it interesting, others will find it disjointed. It seems I will stick with the traditional Talisker offerings. Around € 50.

Score: 79/100


Did you know Knockando was the first distillery in Scotland to be built with electric lighting in 1898?

This Knockando 12 years old was bottled in 1979 but the expression goes back to the end of the 1950’s when Justerini & Brooks (J&B indeed) bought the company. In fact a 12yo with vintage statement still exists today.

 

Knockando 12 Dateo ImportKnockando 12 yo 1967
(43%, J&B for Dateo Import Italy 1979)

Nose: light, fairly neutral, with lots of hay and cut apples, maybe grapefruit as well. Hints of waxed paper and dusty old books. Gets a little sweeter over time. Mouth: not too bold, oily, malty and slightly honeyed. Apple flavours again. Oranges. Grassy notes, soft resin and heather. Hints of green tea. Finish: fairly long, with some ginger, grasses, apple skin and cereal notes.

I wasn’t totally impressed with this Knockando, but on the other hand it seems to be more complex than modern bottlings and quite balanced for a standard bottling. Around € 150 in auctions.

Score: 80/100


New Malts of Scotland releases have reached us a bit later than normally. The oldest of the latest batch is this 36 years old Longmorn 1976. Stocks of this praised vintage are quickly drying up.

 

Longmorn 1976 Malts of ScotlandLongmorn 36 yo 1976 (53,7%, Malts of Scotland 2013, bourbon hogshead, MoS 13029, 143 btl.)

Nose: the typical warm nose that’s full of apricot jam, orange juice and honeydew melon. It’s not the most tropical 1976 but there are still hints of mango and pineapple. Beehive notes like wax, pollen and honey. Soft polished oak. Hints of bergamot after a while. Some brioche and mocha. Nice! Mouth: initially warm, sweet and fruity. Oranges and apricot pie. A second wave is really spicy: ginger and pepper, some mint and plain tannins (a bit more than the 2010-2011 siblings). Returns nicely to honey and the pink grapefruit that we find in many 1976 Speysiders. Finish: long, fruity but also pretty oaky with some resin and wee touches of Nivea cream. Or anti-wrinkle cream for old malts.

 

A beautiful profile – we knew that already – and great to see another example of that. Generally in line with the previous Longmorn 1976 releases, although the best examples had probably been discovered already. Around € 250 – it seems they are still available in most stores.

Score: 91/100


Once in a while I force myself to buy samples of recent standard releases. I’ll try to find a nice balance with the more expensive stuff, but it’s absolutely true that there are nice value for money drams among the official ranges.

The Glengoyne core range was revised and repackaged a couple of months ago. In Europe this 12 years old expression is the youngest to be bottled at 43% (the younger 10yo is bottled at 40%). The 12 is matured using a mix of first-fill sherry, refill sherry, as well as first-fill bourbon hogsheads, which is a first for this distillery. While the sherry influence may be less obvious than in previous years, it should still be present. It’s chill-filtered.

 

Glengoyne 12 yearsGlengoyne 12 yo (43%, OB 2012)

Nose: very malty with a lot of caramel sweetness. Sweetened lemon juice and yellow apples. Honey. Hints of hazelnuts. Shows more vanilla after a while. Mouth: medium weight, sweet and malty again with a creamy, slightly buttery mouthfeel. Toffee and a slightly gingerbread spiciness. Hints of vanilla cake. Some light fruity notes of apple and melon. Some hay and almond paste. Finish: medium long, simple and sweet.

A pretty good entry-level malt with a bit of everything, yet so balanced that it remains inoffensive. My score was lower on the nose than on the palate, where it shows a few unique touches and really begins to shine. Around € 40.

Score: 82/100


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Coming up

  • Auchentoshan 15yo (Kintra)
  • Ben Nevis 1997 (Maltbarn)
  • Tomatin 1978 (Cadenhead / Nectar)
  • Aultmore 2007 (Daily Dram)
  • Karuizawa 45 Year Old (cask #2925)
  • Glengoyne 1999 (Palo Cortado)

1507 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.