Single malt whisky - tasting notes

This is one of the latest Karuizawa Noh releases, a 1977 from a single sherry cask released in 2010. I’m curious for the future – all remaining Karuizawa stocks have been bought by Number One Drinks, the UK distributor behind these Noh series.

 

Karuizawa 1977 Noh 4592Karuizawa 32 yo 1977
(60,7%, OB 2010, cask 4592, 190 btl.)

Nose: earthy and meaty. Roasted coffee. Incense. Charred steak. Very smoky for a Karuizawa. All of this mixed with a lovely sweetness of chocolate and black cherries. Precious spices like Szechuan and cardamom. Sandalwood and tobacco. Mouth: hot with big peppery notes. Quite sharp at first, then some dry walnuts and leather, sweeter caramel, dark chocolate and bags of cigar leafs. Lovely chocolate / cherry combo. Really great. Camphor, hints of tar even. Some liquorice. Wow. Finish: long and rich, spicy..

Another extreme Karuizawa. Interesting to see it shows a bigger and different kind of smokiness – not the usual matchstick notes from other bottlings. The savouriness is quite exceptional. With a slightly bigger fruitiness this would have been heavenly. Originally around € 170 – now sold for crazy amounts.

Score: 91/100


I’m always delighted when casks from rare distilleries find their way to the market. Glenburgie can be hard to find.

A sister cask #11242 was bottled last year by Duncan Taylor, but I couldn’t find it outside of Japan. This cask #11239 is available in Europe.

 

Glenburgie 1988 #11239Glenburgie 22 yo 1988
(57,3%, Duncan Taylor Rare Auld 2011,
cask  #11239, 233 btl.)

Nose: nice and sweet, with yellow orchard fruits (yellow plums, apple compote, quinces) and traces of tropical fruits (mango) and pineapple sweets. Some vanilla and faint nutty notes. Several kinds of honey. Mouth: very sweet again, with a nice vanilla / coconut combo, pineapple syrup, mango sweets… very jammy. Sweet almond paste. Some creamy mocha and toffee towards the end. Finish: long, sweet and sugary. Again traces of tropical fruits.

Quite a lovely Glenburgie, with a sweet profile that’s referring to grain whisky at times. The tropical fruitiness (which made me think of much older BenRiach) and vanilla makes it hugely drinkable and easy to enjoy. Excellent value for money – around € 75.

Score: 87/100


Caroni is a heavy-style rum made in Trinidad & Tobago. The distillery, which had been operating since 1918, was closed in 2002, which caused some of its large stocks to become available for independent bottlers. Bristol Spirits claims this cask (fully matured in charred barrels in the Caribbean) is among the oldest Trinidad rums ever bottled.

 

Caroni 1974 Bristol Classic rumCaroni 34 yo 1974
(46%, Bristol Spirits 2009, 1500 btl.)

Nose: starts on those wonderful diesel- and tar-like aromas that you sometimes find in old rum. Baked apples. Burnt sugar. Sultanas. Grows more herbal and spicy (pepper, cinnamon) after a while. Some oak. Not immensely complex but quite intriguing. Mouth: again it reminds me of car workshops. More oak now, with a dryness and notes of liquorice. Definitely tarry. Quite herbal as well (cough syrup). Dried fruits in the background. Maybe some eucalyptus. Finish: long, dry, with the liquorice standing out. A faint rubbery hint in the very end. The dry glass shows lovely sultanas, more than while tasting it.

I find this quite amazing. By that I mean it’s uniquely disturbing (for someone used to whisky) rather than being immediately attractive. I can imagine some people will find this too weird as well. Around € 175. Thanks Jack.


Edinburgh-based grain distillery North British is usually found in older expressions (we’ve even had a 48 year-old). Here’s a medium aged single cask version bottled by Master of Malt.

 

North British 1991 20yo - Master of MaltNorth British 20 yo 1991 (55,8%, Master of Malt 2011, first fill bourbon, 244 btl.)

Nose: rather warm at first with plenty of vanilla and fresh oak shavings. Soft white chocolate / very light mocha notes in the background. Sweet and thick. After some time it seems to loose some of its vanilla creaminess and it gets a little sharper, with traces of grass and Nivea cream that I found before in much older North British. Mouth: very sweet and quite surprising. Big notes of Pisang Ambon (banana liqueur) and Malibu (coconut liqueur). Very thick and almost sticky. Sweet corn. Pineapple syrup. Butterscotch. A burst of pepper and ginger in the end. Finish: not too long, still extremely sweet with some spirity notes and an oaky / spicy edge.

This is not a complex grain whisky but it’s interesting as it lacks some typical grain flavours but also shows a few less common elements. Around € 52.

Score: 82/100


Tormore 10yo

01 Sep 2011 | Tormore

Michael Jackson called Tormore the most elegant distillery (architecturally speaking). It’s modern (built in 1958) and slightly bombastic. If you like traditional distilleries then this one is probably not for you. If you like a modern interpretation, yes it’s beautiful.

Anyway, the whisky is part of the Ballantine’s blend and there’s an official Tormore 12yo and a 15yo.

 

Tormore 10 yo DreherTormore 10 yo ‘Pure malt 100%’
(43%, OB for Dreher Milano, around 1980, 75cl)

Nose: quite mild. Cereal notes with fruity bits. Red berries, oranges, pears. Heering cherry liqueur. Hints of malt and praline as well. Mouth: it seems bigger than 43% and balances between sweet notes and sourish / resinous elements. Apples with caramel sauce. Mint, cloves and bitter oranges. Nutty notes, with some sharpness in the aftertaste (like radish). Finish: a bit undefined, with hints of oak. Not too long.

This Tormore shows a great fruitiness on the nose. The palate is slightly less interesting but still full-flavoured. You’ll often read Tormore from this period seems more intense than you’d expect, which is a quality in its own right. Collector’s item.

Score: 87/100


This Springbank 1969 was distilled on the 12th February 1969 and left to mature in refill butt #266. It was bottled on the 18th April 2003.

 

Springbank 1969 SV 266Springbank 34 yo 1969 (56,7%, Signatory Vintage Rare Reserve 2003, refill butt #266, 494 btl.)

Nose: all kinds of oil and wax: linseed oil, engine oil, brylcream… Rather dusty with hints of old libraries. Hints of vegetables, moss, wet fern forest. A little mint. Not bad but slightly uninspiring. Mouth: a watered down oak infusion, or so it seems. Quite tired I’m afraid. Cloves. Wax. Tobacco. Faint eucalyptus, but all of this is rather soft and quiet. Then developing some farmy notes and something bitter. Finish: bitter, dry, tannic and even a bit medicinal.

 

I expected a lot from a 1960’s Springbank but unfortunately this is not a highflyer. At first I thought the sample could be tainted, but then it turned out other reviewers mentioned the same disappointment. Oh well… Around € 300 if you happen to find a bottle.

Score: 81/100


Duncan TaylorI already highlighted this Port Ellen at the Wild West Whisky Fest last year. Now I had the chance to taste it in depth.

 

 

Port Ellen 1982 Duncan Taylor 674Port Ellen 26 yo 1983 (54,6%, Duncan Taylor Rarest of the Rare 2010, cask #674, 282 btl.)

Nose: hey! Even better than I remembered it. Relatively soft sooty and smokey notes with hints of cured meat. A bunch of sweet notes as well: chocolate ganache, praline and Black Forest gateau! Fruity cherry / mixed red fruits jam. Hints of tobacco with a very delicate medicinal touch. Warm precious wood like rosewood and sandalwood. Few of the sharp / austere notes that you find in other Port Ellen. When compared to Port Ellen PE1 for example, it becomes clear how extremely luscious this is. Just excellent. Mouth: sweet peat and ashes mixed with rounder notes again (cocoa, sweet almonds, berries, figs). A hint of peppermint. Slowly drying towards tobacco. Finish: very long, drier and a little peppery.

An extraordinary Port Ellen with an almost perfect sherried style. If you liked PE1, then you’ll love this. Around € 190. I’ve spent some time trying to find it, but it seems to be sold out.

Score: 93/100


Glenfiddich Glenfiddich has great old casks lying around, although they’re usually quite pricey. I tried this 1973 Private Vintage bottled for LMdW at the Weedram Masters XXV, head-to-head with the regular Glenfiddich 12 years old.

 

Glenfiddich 1973 cask 28563 LMdWGlenfiddich Private Vintage 34 yo 1973 (46,6%, OB for LMdW 2007, hogshead #28563, 209 btl.)

Nose: starts fruity (big apricot aromas, oranges, grapefruit) and oaky (polished oak). Orchard fruits, some honey as well. A gentleman but really wide and complex. Soft spices (pepper, vanilla, subtle gingerbread) as well as some waxy notes. Very light nougat. Mouth: smooth and citrusy (grapefruit) with a herbal oakiness (soft tannins). Develops on dried fruits. Bittersweet with a minty edge. Bergamot tea. Finish: rather long, fruity with a bitter touch.

Starts great but the score is brought down by the slightly oaky palate. Around € 390 at the time, now sold out.

Score: 89/100


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  • MARS: On this point I can only agree, even the badest karuizawa is higly wanted and really expensive. ;-) Personaly I have nothing against the fact that the
  • WhiskyNotes: I'm not counting new releases - the producer can basically ask any price you want regardless of the real value. That leaves us with a couple of 1972's
  • MARS: The last 35 years old cost 1400€, the 1972's rare malt are at 4000/5000€(minimum minimorum) at auction and the 1972/40 years old release of last y

Coming up

  • Mortlach 1995 'Stem Ginger Preserve' (Wemyss)
  • Dalmore Valour
  • Aberlour a'bunadh Batch #50
  • Glendronach 8yo (Whiskymanufaktur)
  • Yamazaki 12 Year Old
  • Tomatin 1997 (Liquid Library)

1751 notes by Ruben

WhiskyNotes - Ruben LuytenThis blog is my personal collection of impressions, written while searching for the ultimate single malt whisky.